The Dead Sea will help control the climate?

On board the barge, which will be located above the deepest point on earth, the research team hopes to get detailed information about the half-million years of Earth's history to uncover the secrets of climate change and natural disasters.
On board the barge, which will be located above the deepest point on earth, the research team hopes to get detailed information about the half-million years of Earth's history to uncover the secrets of climate change and natural disasters, writes MIGnews.com.

Immersing Sunday instruments on the bottom from the Dead Sea, a group of engineers and scientists began extracting layers bottom, moving to the earth core. Work will continue for about two months, the experts are going to achieve a depth of 1,200 meters below sea level.

"The sediments at the bottom of the Dead Sea — the best" book "on climate change and earthquakes for the entire Middle East," — said the head of the project Zvi Ben-Avraham of the Israeli Academy of Sciences. Recall that the very shore of the sea in the desert is located at 420 meters below sea level.

The Dead Sea, Ben-Avraham said, collects water flows out of the Sinai desert in Egypt and up to the Golan Heights, that is, with an area of about 42,000 square kilometers, providing a large amount of material for climate research.

He is also on a fault line between two continental plates moving at different speeds, resulting in the Dead Sea there is a significant tectonic activity.

Like annual rings of trees show their age, and the seabed annually receives two layers of sediments. Scientists will analyze 500,000 years of geological history, decipher the samples and use them to understand the future, said Ben-Avraham.

Specialists will derive information about ancient rains, floods, droughts and earthquakes, which can then be used in research and in deciding how best to cope with global warming.

The Dead Sea is a favorite tourist destination because of the unique salinity and its medicinal properties. This reservoir is among the 14 finalists, of which through international online voting will select the seven wonders of nature.

But in recent years, scientists and environmentalists are trying to come up with a solution to stop the receding shoreline of the sea, in what many accuse the wasteful use of water.

Project to study the Dead Sea is part of the international program of the continental drilling. Around the world is expected to drill dozens of wells in an attempt to find the best way to manage the Earth's resources and environment.

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