Oceans has the dual attack CO2

Carbon dioxide into the water of the oceans as a pollutant triggers unwanted changes in the level of acidity of water. An additional factor here is the influence of increasing the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere. According to the latest data, the process is already beginning to affect the populations of commercial fish and shellfish.

Oceans has the dual attack CO2

Since the industrial revolution, carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere has increased by 40%, mainly due to the use of combustible materials and inefficient methods of farming. As usual, customary in nature, the oceans are trying to absorb the excess CO2, which invariably leads to acidification of the water through the formation of carbon dioxide.
The situation becomes even more critical when additional portions of CO2 fall into the ocean in the form of residues of agricultural fertilizers, human waste and animal waste. The level of oxygen in the ocean, meanwhile begins to fall, leading to disastrous consequences for the aquatic flora and fauna.
Launched scientists computer model shows the possible effects of acidification of ocean water, which accounted for a further increase in the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere. The main result will be a synergistic interaction of carbon dioxide from both sources, and acidification may become irreversible phase with the overall increase in air temperature.
Especially the process of double acidification will affect coastal regions where seafood is industrial production on a large scale, such as in the Gulf of Mexico and in the Baltic Sea. The most vulnerable species will be oysters, scallops, mussels and other bivalves, as well as popular types of fish.

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