British officer took a photo of the march of ghosts in Borneo

September 28, 2012 14:53

Fan of military history, John Talloch despite hardening, resulting in the years of military service, almost speechless when I saw the ghosts of soldiers killed in the Second World War. Traveling to places of military glory of Her Majesty's Army, retired major areas taking photos, one way or another connected with the events of seventy years ago. And on one of the pictures, he suddenly noticed a mysterious silhouettes resembling ghosts.

British officer made the photo "march of ghosts" in Borneo
John Tulloch / BNPS.co.uk

It was summer 2010 on the island of Kalimantan (Borneo), writes The Daily Mail. Talloch decided to take a ride on routes Sandakanskih infamous "death marches": escorting British and Australian prisoners of war in 1945. Along the way he often photographed.

"I then took pictures of 200 or so, and at first did not notice. But then he began to review the photos on the computer just froze. In the picture are 17 or 18 of ghostly silhouettes emerging from the jungle on the road towards Ranau — says 66-year-old Briton. — It took me a while to get over it and try to understand what they see. "

During World War II, Japan sent some of their prisoners of war in North Borneo for the construction work. Shortly before his defeat in 1945, the military command decided to transfer prisoners — mostly it was the Australians — from the town of Sandakan to Ranau. In patients with intolerable conditions emaciated people were rapidly losing strength. Japanese soldiers finished them zakalyvaya bayonets, shooting or beheading. According to some accounts, in the absence of food were seen even cannibalism.

As a result of the 2500 war managed to survive only six, which rescued by local residents. Organizers of the "death marches" — these were some — later tried as war criminals, many were sentenced to death.

As a result of the 2500 war managed to survive only six, which rescued by local residents.  Organizers of the "death marches" - these were some - later tried as war criminals, many were sentenced to death cas.awm.gov.au

As a result of the 2500 war managed to survive only six, which rescued by local residents. Organizers of the "death marches" — these were some — later tried as war criminals, many were sentenced to death
cas.awm.gov.au

Well aware of this horrific event of the war, Major Talloch, examining the photo, at first thought that the shot hit the ghosts of tortured men. According to him, he showed the picture to several friends, and they, too, were ready to believe in the supernatural.

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