Thousands of dead birds washed up on the coastline of southern Michigan

Thousands of dead birds washed up on the coastline of southern Michigan

January 9, 2013. As the Daily Tribune, rapidly changing environment in the Great Lakes basin has caused the population decline of waterfowl, especially loons, in the state of Michigan. Loons, beloved and iconic bird This area, known for its eerie solitude and unusual coloring in large numbers found dead along the northern shore of Lake Michigan. Loons and other birds washed up on the shore — from the Upper Peninsula, up to the national reserve Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore.

The age of many of the dead loons less than a year and they have not even begun to breed. The cause of extinction, as well as other similar incidents in 2006 and 2007, has not been fully established. There is a suspicion that the death of birds associated with new invasive species, particularly mussels, zebra mussels (species of bivalves — approx. Ed), Gobies, which have become part of the food chain. Invasive mussels brought into the lake of botulism infection, and it became a carrier bulls. It is on the bulls and hunt fish-eating birds of the region.

Experts took samples of materials for testing and awaiting the outcome of this month, and then be able to draw definitive conclusions about the causes of death of the birds.

Thousands of dead birds washed up on the coastline of southern Michigan

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