Why eclipses do not occur at every new and full moon?

Why eclipses do not occur at every new and full moon? It is interesting

Eclipses do not occur at every new and full moon, and their frequency varies from 4 to 7 times a year. Some of these lunar and some solar. They can be full or partial.

A lunar eclipse occurs when the Earth, Sun and Moon are in a line, with the Earth located at the center. During this period, the shadow cast by the Earth, the Moon completely covers. The last in 2011, is a lunar eclipse observed on December 10. Solar eclipse occurs in the opposite phase of the moon — a new moon, when the moon is located centrally between the sun and Earth.

The moon comes full circle for nearly a month. If she goes around the Earth in the same plane as the Earth's orbit, the two eclipses would occur every month. And the lunar eclipse occurred would in every full moon, and two weeks later, at every new moon, we would have been able to observe the solar eclipse. So, for a year, there were not less than 24 eclipses.

But why eclipses do not occur at every new and full moon? The answer is simple. Lunar and solar eclipses occur less often as the Moon's orbit is tilted about 5 degrees to Earth's orbit, which means that their speed can not always be the same.

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