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Whats the weather like on the other planets?

Alex Schmetkov

Mostly very different to what it’s like on Earth! The hottest and coldest places on Earth are in Death Valley, California and Vostok Station, Antarctica, which have official records of 56.7 degrees Celsius (134 degrees Fahrenheit) and -89.2 degrees Celsius (-128.6 degrees Fahrenheit) respectively. But it gets way more extreme in other parts of the Solar System.

Martian air is very thin, less than one hundredth of the density of Earth’s atmosphere, and so it can experience wild swings in temperature during a day, from highs of 26 degrees Celsius (80 degrees Fahrenheit) to lows of -129 degrees Celsius (-200 degrees Fahrenheit). It’s often engulfed in huge dust storms, too.

Jupiter’s turbulent upper atmosphere has one distinctive weather feature: the Great Red Spot. This is a hurricane the diameter of two Earths that has been raging for around 300 years. The winds here blow at around 400 kilometres per hour (250 miles per hour), while the strongest hurricane on Earth blew at 322 kilometres per hour (200 miles per hour). Saturn’s even windier, blowing up to around 1,770 kilometres per hour (1,100 miles per hour)!

One of the coldest objects in the Solar System is Neptune’s moon Triton, which is littered with ice volcanoes and has a surface temperature of -235 degrees Celsius (-391 degrees Fahrenheit), while Mercury has no weather to speak of at all, just baking highs of 430 degrees Celsius (806 degrees Fahrenheit) and lows of -183 degrees Celsius (-279.4 degrees Fahrenheit). JOC

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