WHATS

NEXT

COMMON THREADS

A c h i l l e C a s t i g l i o n i brought post¬war Italian design into the future, but he never left his sense of humor behind. The architect and industrial designer (1918-2002) created dozens of products and was so influential that New York’s Museum of Modern Art granted him a full-scale retrospective in 1997. His studio in Milan draws thousands of acolytes each year. And his many iconic designs— including the 1962 A r c o lamp with its marble base and great curve of steel, his M e z z a d r o tractor-scat stool, and his Fuchsia hanging lamp for Flos—are still sought after for stylish homes around the world.

Rut for all his stature, C a s t i g l i o n i remained fascinated with the everyday. He applied his penetrating vision and joie de vivre to everything from ashtrays and tableware to folding chairs and light switches. He once won an award for a beer spigot. “Start from scratch. Stick to common sense,” he famously said.

Fashion and design Web retailer recently joined forces with the artist’s foundation to reissue four classic C a s t i g l i o n i designs, as well as one that has never before been available. His 1981 C a c c i a v i t e table, with screw in legs that emulate the forms of screwdrivers, is once again in production, as are his 1988 Record watch for Alessi, now in a new color way; the 1996 stainless steel O n d u l a fruit bowl; and Sleek, an implement, half spatula and half spoon, that he devised to get the last remnants out of a peanut butter or jam jar.

The never-before-released item is the most surprising—a pair of whimsical smocks he fashioned in 1967, each outfitted with enough pockets to hold all the tools a designer needs. Like all of Castiglioni’s works, they arc colorful, practical, and eminently charming.

AMERICAN BEAUTIES

With the opening of a sleek new shop in New York’s Tribeca neighborhood, ultra hip Detroit company S h l n o l a Is spreading its gospel of American-made goods with its retro-flavored bicycles and wrist watches, linen-bound note¬books. and colorful leather backpacks, wallets, and iPad holders many of which are designed and manufactured in the Motor City. The eclectic boutique, with interiors by the Rockwell Group, also features collaborations with like minded companies, a pop-up display of work by Detroit craftspeople, and a coffee bar newsstand run by Manhattan restaurant The Smile.

BLING RING

WHEN DESIGNING THE SHERATON H U Z H C U HOT SPRING RESORT, LOCATED ON THE SHORES OF EASTERN CHINA’S SERENE T A I H U LAKE. ARCHITECT MA Y A N S O N G LOOKED TO THE MOON FOR INSPIRATIONAL NIGHT THE RING-SHAPE BUILDING CASTS ITS OWN HALO-LIKE REFLECTION ON THE WATER. LOCATED IN H U Z H O U. AN ANCIENT CITY WITH A HISTORY IN THE SILK TRADE. THE 27-STORY STRUCTURE GLITTERS BOTH OUTSIDE AND IN, WITH 321 LUXE GUEST ROOMS AND A LOBBY BOASTING A 28-TON PIECE OF JADE AS WELL AS A HUGE J LIGHT INSTALLATION MADE OP SWAROVSKI crystals.

CLEAR ADVANTAGE

Photographers have long used windows as vantage points, framing devices, and sources of light—not to mention as metaphors for the voyeuristic aspects of their work. “At the Window: A Photographer’s View” an exhibition at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, isan imaginative roundup of 52 images, taken across the history of the medium, each of which incorporates a window. Early photographers Eugene A t g e t and William Henry Fox Talbot express their fascination with the disembodied wigs and bonnets to be found in shop-front displays, while in the 20th century Alfred Stieglitz and Andre Kertesz trained their cameras on the daunting columns of windows that ran up the sides of tall buildings. Contemporary artists Robert Adams and Gregory Crewdson use windows to create shadow boxes of suburban atomic. And, in an entry from Uta Berths “…and of time” scries from 2000, right, hazy light moves across wall in a meditation on timcand mortality

SQL - 17 | 0,494 сек. | 7.39 МБ