THE Future That BOMBED

THE NEXT BIG THINGS— THAT WEREN’T

OVER THE YEARS POP PHOTO has been pretty good at predicting future photo technology. “Pretty good,” though, does not mean “flawless.” And the photo industry has launched some, um, breakthrough products that should have stayed on the drawing board. Just take a look.

FUTURE INTERROGATIVE DEPT.

• February 1958: “Will [Video] Tape Replace Film?”

•April 1958: “Are Subminiatures a Threat to 35mm Supremacy?” •October 1958: “Will the Russians Beat Us to a Fully Automated Camera?”

•Sept. 1972: “Is 35mm Dead?”

•June 1975: “Can Photography Help Your Child Develop a Superbrain?”

•December 1978: “Serious 110

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SIGMA

35mm f/1.4 DG ull frame 35mm wideangle le

HSM £699

Sigma’s new 35mm f/1. If that sounds a little vague then let’s cut straight to the bottom line: this is simply one of the very best lenses currently available.

Unzipping the padded case reveals a broad manual-focusing ring filling the front half of the barrel with a focused-distance window and a focus-mode switch in the rear half. The lens feels a little weighty but very solidly built.

A really nice little touch is the white panel that is unveiled when the lens is switched to AF mode, saving the user

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How to add film sprockets

Nothing says film photography quite like exposing a roll of 35mm, sprocket holes and all. Learn how to recreate the effect digitally

JORDAN BUTTERS: Film emulation is big business in modern digital photography. Despite the resolution, crispness and clarity that modern cameras are able to obtain, part of us still yearns for the analogue look and feel that you only get from shooting film. This technique allows you to obtain a realistic-looking 35mm sprocket film effect using the power of Photoshop.

Sprocket holes are the row of perforations along the top and bottom of a strip of 35mm film —

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A COLLECTORS LIFE FOR ME

When Tony Kemplen resolved to use a different film camera each week, he discovered a treasure trove of lost gems.

The instamatic, or 126 film format, is 50 years old this year. I’d like to be able to wish it a happy birthday, but it’s been dead and buried for nearly a decade. Of course, many of the cameras live on, although they are hardly enjoying a fulfilling life, being more akin to zombies — living dead deprived of their source of sustenance. Unlike the 126’s little brother, the 110 Pocket Instamatic, which has returned from the grave, those of

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