Scientists have resumed drilling to Lake Vostok in Antarctica

Russian experts, leading to the drilling of the well subglacial lake Vostok in Antarctica, have resumed work, told RIA Novosti the head of the press service of the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute of Hydromet (AARI) Sergei Lesenkov.

Scientists have resumed drilling to Lake Vostok in Antarctica

"Drilling has resumed after a short break for necessary maintenance work. We can not yet predict exactly when to leave the ice-water boundary, as there are several methods for the determination of the border, and they have all the precision of plus or minus 20 meters," — said Lesenkov.

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In the Antarctic lake find a new species of bacteria

12.03.2013

Under layers of ice in Antarctica Russian scientists have found a new species of bacteria. This discovery may tell more about the nature of science Lake Vostok. These bacteria, which genotype is only 86% identical to the known science of bacteria were found in a sample of water from Lake Vostok, which lies at a depth of two miles beneath the Antarctic ice. The composition of the water of the lake has not changed for many millions of years.  

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Giovanna could return

Giovanna could return Natural Disasters

Tropical Cyclone Giovanna, raged on about. Madagascar and Mozambique Channel, has caused landslides in Moramange. Due to heavy rains in the river Imamba not stand two dams, including drowning adult and one child is eighteen months. The cyclone killed 65 people, 11 thousand homeless. Reported massive flooding of rice fields and small villages.

Northern suburb of Antananarivo is cut off from the city center. For many people, the only way out of the water were coming roofs of their homes. Schools and offices are closed, the streets turned into canals.

The greatest damage caused TC

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The permafrost in Antarctica is melting at an accelerating rate

29.07.2013

Intriguing news again came from Antarctica — the first time scientists have found that the permafrost in Antarctica is melting at an accelerating rate, and this is not due to global warming, according to RIA-Novosti reported with reference to the journal Scientific Reports.

Scientists led by Joseph Levy (Joseph Levy) from the University of Texas at Austin (USA) gathered data on the melting of underground ice in Garwood Valley, located in the Dry Valleys of McMurdo in Victoria Land, Antarctica.

Scientists have found that the rate of melting permafrost rose from 2001 to

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The success of the Russian mission in Antarctica

The success of the Russian mission in Antarctica Facts

Participating in friendly competition with British and American scientists, February 8, 2012 the first Russian explorers have succeeded in its 20-year mission to drill Antarctic ice to reach the prehistoric Lake Vostok, hidden under the ice for more than 14 million years. Scientists were able to extract 40 liters of water to be studied.

In Antarctica is about 90% ice and 70% of the fresh water on Earth. The third largest continent can be compared to the U.S., increased by half. More than 200 subglacial lakes found in the depths of

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The study of ancient lake in Antarctica may explain the future of Earth

The study of ancient lake in Antarctica may explain the future of Earth Scientists have shown

British scientists are hoping that the ancient lake Ellsworth, located at a depth of 3 kilometers under the cover of ice, will help in the study of climate change, sea level change and the emergence of new forms of life.

Ice cover over the lake does not produce geothermal heat of the earth, protecting the lake from freezing. In October, a team of scientists travel to Antarctica for the first phase of the study, which will cost at least £ 7 million. In order

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Rare earthquake forces in Antarctica

Rare earthquake forces in Antarctica Natural Disasters

The morning of 15 January near about. Elephant (Mordvinova), South Shetland Islands, recorded an earthquake of 6.6 points. According to the U.S. Geological Survey earthquake had a depth of 10 km, with the epicenter at 539 km to the west of. Coronation Island, South Orkney Islands, 625 miles northeast of Palmer Station, Antarctica, and 1019 km to the south of the Falkland Islands. No one was hurt, as in a radius of several hundred kilometers no settlements.

The European Mediterranean Seismological Centre (EMSC) reports that the earthquake had a strength of 6.7 points

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Scientists discovered in Antarctica, the largest subglacial flood

July 4, 2013. In Antarctica, scientists have been able to find signs of the enormous ice flooding that has accumulated about 6 billion tons of water close to the ocean. The cause of flooding could become over the banks of a giant lake Cook, located under the ice cap of the continent. Displacement in this location can be compared with a double volume of water contained in the River Thames.

According to data from the satellite, the lake is hidden under the 2.7-kilometer layer of ice, which sank in the place where the flood was formed. The peak of the

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Too early to talk about speeding up the melting of glaciers

July 18, 2013. While climate change is the responsibility of such an exact science as fundamental physics, this is largely the result of a complex interaction of factors that are not entirely clear. For example, it is clear that in the context of global warming sea level rise as a warmer water in the oceans expand and glaciers and ice sheets melt. But the rate of sea level rise and its end point remains the subject of heated debate.

This week, some clarity to the issue have two new articles. One devoted to where the sea level will stop when

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70-degree jump in temperature in Antarctica

Dome of the automatic weather station

September 27, 2013. Argus dome is considered one of the coldest places on Earth.

This is the highest point in Antarctica (4093 m), although one of the least known places on the globe. It is situated at one end of the elongated ridge (about 60 km long and 10 km wide). Ice thickness is more than 3000 m paleo-scientists believe this is a suitable place for the collection of ice cores, which provide a record of the past climate and atmospheric gas composition in the past, for a period of more than

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