TIME EXPOSURE

25 YEARS AGO

AUGUST 1984

1.

Color form: This graphic abstraction of a woman in a swimsuit was made by Japanese photographer Hideki Fujii as part of a series of images for a calendar. He used a 35mm SLR and a 180mm lens. The exposure, lit by electronic flash units, was 1 /100 sec between f/11 and f/16 on Kodachrome 64 film. The printing process rendered the image more abstract-an unaltered version ran in our 1985 Photography Annual.

2

Weimar Berlin: This striking portrait of actress Lotte Lenya (who was also the wife of Kurt Weill) was taken in Berlin

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The Go-To Guy

“Become the guy that makes good stuff, knows I people, and makes things happen, and you’re the one they’re going to hire», says Northampton shire-based Adam Duckworth, whose client list ranges from Las-toilet to Suzuki and the Royal Horticultural Society. «Then, once they’ve hired you, you need to over deliver.

«There’s no point looking back to how the industry used to be: it’s about working out what the new normal is, and how you can add value to the things that you do.

«For me, it’s about knowing how editors think, and what the issues are in their market, and

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Telling stories

Adam Ferguson explains how he uses individuals on an assignment to turn a story from the abstract to the personal while on the front line of international photojournalism. He talks to David Clark.

ADAM Ferguson is one of the brightest talents among a new generation of photojournalists. A regular contributor to Time magazine, National Geographic and The New York Times, he has won awards in the World Press Photo and Pictures of the Year International competitions. His work has included stories on the conflict in Afghanistan, elections in Burma (Myanmar) and Iraq’s recovery after two major wars.

Yet two years

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Taking centre court

They talk to Oliver Atwell.

EVERYONE likes a celebration. That’s particularly true when you’re faced with the borderline apocalyptic bleakness that is often characteristic of our British summers. Royal marriages and Olympic gold medals aside, nothing gets those plastic Union Jacks waving like a good old-fashioned tennis tournament. Back in July, Wimbledon was once more upon us and the cries of jubilation and anguished gnashing of teeth filled the air around south-west London. This year the sun decided to take residence in our skies throughout the entire tournament, turning Murray Mound into a sea of bare skin and sunglasses. Yet

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NO CHEESE, PLEASE

Add power to your portraits by ditching the grin.

Traditional photojournalism shies away from having subjects look directly at the camera and smiling, since a photo story should seem as if the photographer were an invisible witness to reality. Yet despite that convention, Boston-based photographer Porter Gifford finds that his visual narratives grow stronger when he adds such camera-aware environmental portraits to the story. «It’s a way for viewers to pause and connect more personally with the subject,» Gifford says. «But, a photograph of someone not smiling is traditionally seen as a more serious.»

The enigmatic moment in his photo

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GAME, SET& MATCH

BEHIND THE LUSH GREEN GRASS OF THE 2013 WIMBLEDON CHAMPIONSHIP, NIKON UK WAS BREAKING NEW GROUND WITH SOME RATHER TRICK PHOTO TECHNOLOGY.. JORDAN BUTTER STAKES A LOOK BEHIND THE SCENES…

GLORIOUS SUNSHINE, STRAWBERRIES and cream, and Andy Murray lifting the Gentlemen’s Singles Trophy at Wimbledon — the Great British summer is off to a fantastic start. Whether you witnessed the splendours of this year’s Wimbledon via the television coverage, or were one of the lucky fans who managed to get tickets to see the spectacle in person, there’s no denying that the tournament was a roaring success. What the thousands

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Dummy Types

When photographer Matthew Rolston walked into the Vent Haven Museum in Fort Mitchell, Kentucky, in 2009, the crowds of huddled ventriloquist dummies on display reminded him of retired performers still awaiting a cue. «It was the best casting call I’ve ever seen,» he recalls.

Rolston, who usually photographs entertainers such as Madonna and Beyonce, was moved by the pathos of these antique wiseacres, toffs, and geezers. «To me, they were amazing abstractions of humanity, and because of the mileage on them, they have all kinds of issues of mortality attached,» he says. Rolston made about 200 large-format portraits of dummies

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60-SECOND EXPOSURE

Few photographers desire to be less organised, but Michel Rajkovic believes greater experimentation could improve his work. Here he talks to B+W about improvisation, imagination and blue sky storms.

Edited by Tracy Hallett.

What is your favourite photographic book?

It has to be Above Zero by German photographer Olaf Otto Becker (published by Hatje Cantz). I love Becker’s minimalist approach and when I look at this book I feel removed from reality.

What is your worst photographic habit?

I don’t use a notebook as often as I should. When I visit a location, I hope that all of the conditions

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In the Midwest United States managed to capture a rare lightning-sprite

June 5, 2013. A rare atmospheric phenomenon, lightning-sprite or special lightning occurring in the mesosphere and the thermosphere at an altitude of 50-90 km, the camera managed to shoot one of the photographers of the U.S. state of Iowa.

As it turned out, the photographer decided to spend the night from May 31 to June 1, 2013 in nature and try to take pictures of the rising sun. But he was much more fortunate, as he managed to take a picture of not only the Auror, but also for the history of mankind to leave the image of

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Russian-Mother

From Moscow to Sakhalin: amazing beauty of Russian landscapes. Russia — a huge unexplored country. Sometimes the attraction of exotic resorts, or the famous monuments of European architecture is much better known to us. But our country is rich equally impressive views. In the vastness of our great country has its own Africa, and Japan has its own, and its Canada. Proved the best photographers of Russia.

AdMe.ru presents snapshots of the most amazing and beautiful parts of Russia, which will not leave you indifferent. They encourage and inspire the perfect look around and learn to look

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