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Январь 2017
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What Next?

Mike Spick gazes into his crystal ball to look at the RAF’s next quarter of a century.

THE ROYAL AIR FORCE celebrated its 75th anniversary on April 1. The past 25 years have been packed with incident — what will the next 25 years hold? Crystal gazing is a perilous occupation at the best of times. All we can state with any certainty is that mankind has a propensity for armed conflict, and that the lessons of the past can often, but not always, be applied to the future. In many ways, the early 1920s were similar to the present

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Under New Command fOR MORE THAN FORTY years Strategic Air Command was the sole operator of the US Air Forces fleet of bombers and the majority of its tankers. However on June 1, 1992 SAC, along with Military Airlift Command (MAC) and Tactical Air Command (TAC) were replaced by two new organisations. Air Combat Command (ACC) and Air Mobility Command (AMC) were formed that day to help streamline USAF operations as the twenty first century approaches. ACC is based broadly along the lines of TAC even to me extent of having its headquarters located in the former Tactical Air Command building at Langley AFB, Virginia. AMC operates from Scott AFB, Illinois from the building previously housing the headquarters of MAC.

All aircraft formerly assigned to MAC, SAC and TAC and which are home based in the continental United States have been transferred to one of the two new Commands, resulting in new markings and colour schemes being applied. Whereas ACC has assumed virtually all of TAC’s assets and AMC has been given the majority of MAC’s aircraft types, the 1,000 plus bombers and tankers of SAC have been divided between the two organisations.

As its title suggests Air Combat Command has the primary role of strike and air defence with an area of responsibility encompassing not just the United States

Continue reading Under New Command fOR MORE THAN FORTY years Strategic Air Command was the sole operator of the US Air Forces fleet of bombers and the majority of its tankers. However on June 1, 1992 SAC, along with Military Airlift Command (MAC) and Tactical Air Command (TAC) were replaced by two new organisations. Air Combat Command (ACC) and Air Mobility Command (AMC) were formed that day to help streamline USAF operations as the twenty first century approaches. ACC is based broadly along the lines of TAC even to me extent of having its headquarters located in the former Tactical Air Command building at Langley AFB, Virginia. AMC operates from Scott AFB, Illinois from the building previously housing the headquarters of MAC.

The youngest ship to be broken

In Ships Mail (SM, July) Andrew Mackinnon asks if the 15-year-old Albert Rickmers was the youngest ship ever to be broken up. The shipping business is very cyclical, and during economic downturns many vessels are broken up prematurely.

After the 1973 oil crisis, tankers were sent for lay-up after completion, and many were scrapped, including BP Tanker’s British Diplomat (1963/30,815gt), which was only 12 years old. Similar things happened during the 1930s Great Depression, most notably with Atlantic Transport Line’s large passenger cargo ships Minnewaska (1923/21,726grt) and Minnetonka (1924/21,998grt), which went to the breakers aged only 11 and ten years

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The years biggest deals

Everybody loves a bargain, but photographers in particular thrill at the prospect of great gear for less. In our annual roundup, we present equipment that we deem top value, whether you’re shopping for travel shooting, everyday use, or studio work.

Travel/adventure

Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD

This latest addition to the class of pro-grade, weather-sealed, f/2.8 constant-aperture telezooms wowed us in our March 2013 lab test. With excellent sharpness, low distortion, and Vibration Compensation that gave us an edge of 3.5 stops on average, it was a winner. And at a price of $1,499, this full-frame optic comes

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THE TROUBLES, the conflict between Unionists and Loyalists in Northern Ireland, began in the 1960s and only really ended in the 1990s after years of negotiation. The Troubles also gave rise to a new wave of photography as people sought to use art to process what was happening to their country.

With his new book, called Northern Ireland: 30 Years of Photography, Colin Graham is exploring this work. Taking 1980 as his starting point, Graham traces the developments in photography through turbulent times.

‘Collectively, these images show a sceptical interrogation of what the politics of Northern Ireland have done to the place,’ says Graham. ‘They’re not looking at political events or figures, but at the effects that high politics has on local lives and spaces.’

ART AND DOCUMENTARY

The book progresses from 1980 right up to the late 2000s, and in the earlier images we see the beginnings of a complex

Continue reading THE TROUBLES, the conflict between Unionists and Loyalists in Northern Ireland, began in the 1960s and only really ended in the 1990s after years of negotiation. The Troubles also gave rise to a new wave of photography as people sought to use art to process what was happening to their country.

The Tall Ship in Glasgow

John Hannavy tells the story of the tail ship Glen lee , a three-masted steel-hulled barque, launched fully rigged in December 1896 and now a museum ship at the Riverside Museum on Point house Quay, Glasgow.

It must have taken quite a leap of faith, and a good deal of imagination, on the part of the Clyde Maritime Trust back in the early 1990s to believe that the abandoned and vandalised hull of Glen lee, which then lay in an all-but-forgotten dock in Spain, could become the centrepiece of a new maritime museum. But today, lovingly restored to her former

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The New Breed

Despite reaching the goals he initially set out to achieve, such as appearing in BBC Wildlife Magazine, pursuing wildlife photography full time is no longer Jules Cox’s ambition.

«You look at these things through rose tinted spectacles when you start out», he says. «You see people like Danny Green, Laurie Campbell and David Tippling, and you think, ‘Wow! What a life that must be’, but then you look at the reality of how competitive it is, and what the market rate for images is, and you say, «Ok … if I’m going to be able to put food on the

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The Guatemala air force.

As a result of the December 1996 Peace Accords that ended 36 years of brutal and tragic internal armed conflict, Guatemala is facing the greatest period of social and economic change — and opportunity — in its 178-year history as an independent nation. Like every other national institution, the armed forces are now in the midst of transitions reflecting changing values and outlooks, and the immense challenges of a nation coming to terms with its past, while moving into the future.

New missions.

For the Fuerza Aerea Guatemalteca (FAG), a period of reflective learning and reorganisationwill prepare it for new

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The Antennae Galaxies.

How these colliding galaxies could reveal the fate of our Milky Way.

The Antennae Galaxies, also known as NGC 4038 (left) and NGC 4039 (right), are a pair of interacting galaxies 45 million light years away that were first discovered by William Herschel in 1785. Located in the NGC 4038 group along with five other galaxies, they are currently in the process of colliding. This particular image was taken by the Hubble Space Telescope and shows how the collision is affecting the two galaxies.

They began colliding a few hundred million years ago, making them one of the youngest and

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Tarantula

BIGGEST NEBULA

The largest known nebula in the universe is many times larger than the Oort cloud and far more massive, with a star cluster at its core which is 450,000 solar masses alone. The Tarantula Nebula is right on our cosmic doorstep in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), which is one of several satellite galaxies orbiting around the Milky Way itself. With a diameter of roughly 800 light years, the Tarantula Nebula (which also goes by the names 30 Doradus and NGC 2070) is a seething cauldron of starbirth containing millions of Suns’ worth of star-forming material, approximately 160,000

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