Weakened President

Society
The Democratic Party of U.S. President Barack Obama has suffered a severe defeat in the midterm elections in the U.S. Congress.

The crushing victory of the Republicans and the statement "Movement chayapitstsya"As a highly influential political force likely to make a significant impact on the course of American foreign policy.

Experts predict, among other things, a tougher stance on Iran, more complex relationship with Russia, and the possible postponement of the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan.

In the coming months, as there can be surprises for both allies and enemies of the United States. The reason for this factor

Experts predict, among other things, a tougher stance on Iran, more complex relationship with Russia, and the possible postponement of the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan.

Uncertainty is the new political platform "tea party" that has broad support in the conservative-oriented voters who helped Republicans and establish control of the House of Representatives.

"Tea Party" united around opposition to the president for national programs Barack Obama, like his plans for health care reform and the economic stimulus program, but the position of "tea" movement on most foreign policy issues remains uncertain.

Christopher Prebl, Browser online edition of the conservative magazine National Review, summed up their preferred point of view: "Many of those who support the" Tea Party "have a common approach to the obvious things, especially in the fact that taxes are too high, and the government is too big. But they there is no common vision of foreign policy. "

Even after such an important election, of course, the basic outlines of American behavior abroad will remain unchanged. The U.S. Constitution gives the president broad powers in determining foreign policy, and Obama's Democratic Party was able to maintain control of the Senate, which plays a key role in promoting or blocking presidential initiatives. However, the Republicans capture the lower chamber gives conservatives a powerful new mouthpiece to express their disagreement with the policy of the White House.

Most importantly, their victory now gives Republicans control of all important committees that determine the course of U.S. policy in various areas. New chairmen of these committees, without exception, thrust conservatives with long track records in the field of foreign policy.

Former U.S. diplomat Elliot Abrams, which is now works at the Council on Foreign Relations — Washington, DC think tank — says that the presence of these leaders will certainly lead to a more hard-line stance against the United States in Iran's nuclear program.

The new political landscape on Capitol Hill is also likely to affect Washington's relations with Russia. One

The new political landscape on Capitol Hill is also likely to affect Washington's relations with Russia.

potential victims may be a new treaty on the reduction of strategic offensive weapons, including limitation of strategic nuclear warheads to 1,550 with both the American and the Russian side. Barack Obama and his Russian counterpart Dmitry Medvedev signed the treaty in April, but it is still awaiting ratification by the Parliament of Russia and the U.S. Senate.

Remains in question, and how the new "tea" Republican Party will solve the problem of Afghanistan. Nektoryya of them, as it looks likely to neakanservatyvnyh principles of the Bush era. Others see the war in Afghanistan and Iraq in a bundle of programs pricey "big government" that they reject the house.

However, there is one just shows the result of this election: President Obama goes out of their weakened president. Abrams explains, "This means that anyone who tries to resist it probably feels that such resistance will now be a little easier."

There is one just shows the result of this election: President Obama goes out of their weakened president.

This is likely to be true in the case of the negotiations in the Middle East, where the U.S. President is constantly pushing the Israelis and Palestinians to reach an agreement. Now, Abrams says, "there are two sides to feel a little freer to give him a rebuff." And they're probably not the only ones who see the opportunity. This election is clearly not to facilitate the work of Barack Obama as the chief U.S. diplomat.

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