Staffing, uncensored during the First World War

Sample photos made in the fields of labor and training camps in the United States and its allies. All these pictures at one time were censored, so as not to cause defeatist attitudes among the population and not to give out the secrets of an adverse party. Now, after 100 years censorship withdrawn.

For growth, click on the photo

Staffing, uncensored during the First World War

This soldier did not die in battle, and during the exercise. The picture was considered demoralizing and rebuked the press.

Staffing, uncensored during the First World War

In the photo, United States President Woodrow Wilson. A moment later, after a photographer took a picture of a stone, made of papier-mache, got a fighter. Snapshot rebuked the press, believing that he can give the enemy a new way of masking.

Staffing, uncensored during the First World War

Black South American fighter, received flowers from the French ladies for their help in the liberation of France. Snapshot rebuked.

Staffing, uncensored during the First World War

The dead soldiers before burial, photos, headed for censorship.

Staffing, uncensored during the First World War

A rare shot — the explosion of South American airship (similar German zeppelin).

Staffing, uncensored during the First World War

Soldiers who drowned in time training.

Staffing, uncensored during the First World War

House destroyed by retreating Germans.

Staffing, uncensored during the First World War

South American fighters killed in combat.

Staffing, uncensored during the First World War

Hidden layout of British bombers.

Staffing, uncensored during the First World War

Drank after taking enemy positions South American fighters. The photograph was censored because alcohol was officially prohibited.

Staffing, uncensored during the First World War

Skeletons before burial.

Staffing, uncensored during the First World War

Fighter, gassed during the exercise.

Staffing, uncensored during the First World War

This shot was banned for printing, so as not to divulge the secrets of the enemy melee.

Staffing, uncensored during the First World War

Sleeping fighters are very similar to the dead, this picture is also headed for censorship.

Staffing, uncensored during the First World War

Because of the lack of tools for training from time to time have used wood models. The picture was forbidden to print, to exclude him isolzovanie of hostile propaganda.

Staffing, uncensored during the First World War

Tests of old times cuirasses for suitability in modern combat. Iron armor coped with this task, but in printing the picture is still not allowed.

Staffing, uncensored during the First World War

Set grenades on the tests. Some of them have long been used in combat, and some were new and hidden workings.

Staffing, uncensored during the First World War

First, in 1917 the rise in prices for bread and staples has led to a wave of "bread riots" in New York. This picture is in the press, of course, did not hit.

Staffing, uncensored during the First World War

The lady with the photo tried to pass any secrets to the German side by encrypting the message in lace apron.

Staffing, uncensored during the First World War

South American men amuse themselves with the troupe of ballet dancers. The picture was banned as a very light-headed.

Staffing, uncensored during the First World War

The New Zealand men are sailing through the Panama Canal. This trip was hidden in the print Picture is not allowed.

Staffing, uncensored during the First World War

New guns against submarines, hidden development.

Staffing, uncensored during the First World War

Grave of Quentin Roosevelt, the brother of President Theodore Roosevelt (in office — 1901 — 1909). Quentin died in aerial combat July 14, 1918.

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