Belarus-Russia: War in the name of brotherly ties

Society
The world press are carefully monitored by the Russian-Belarusian media war.

The British newspaper The Independent, Presenting the history of propaganda blows, which over the past two weeks, exchanged Moscow and Minsk, wrote that the Russian Media intervention in the affairs of Alexander Lukashenko may soon weaken "the iron grip of the last dictator in Europe", with which he holds the power in Belarus.

In the context of this battle The Independent recalls a similar media company exposing violations of human rights in Kyrgyzstan, which is held in Moscow earlier this year against former Kyrgyz president Kurmanbek Bakiyev.

Remembering the analysts who believe that the Kremlin has decided to get rid of Lukashenko at any price, The Independent quoted and Fyodor Lukyanov, editor of the journal "Russia in Global Affairs", according to which of the Belarusian opposition does not have the appropriate substitute for the Belarusian president.

"But the next few months will be interesting. A quarter of the population of Belarus looked a Russian film about Lukashenka. Lukashenko can not afford to ignore the criticism from the West, but he was not accustomed to act in a loud criticism from Russia, which reaches up to the Belarusian people," — said the Bow 'Ivanov.

To make it more smyashney, this war of words going on in the name of brotherly ties and economic union …

British The Economist presented the history of the Russian-Belarusian propaganda war in a sarcastic tone.

"Russia and Belarus will not appear on the defenders of democracy and freedom of speech. But postmodernist approach to politics can produce strange results in the post-Soviet world. Last week, the two authoritarian regimes have denounced each other's authoritarianism and deployed in the state media attacks against each other for the lack of freedom word. To make it more smyashney, this war of words going on in the name of brotherly ties and economic union, "- wrote a weekly newspaper.

According to The Economist, Lukashenko finally managed to get the Kremlin patience of his resistance to the creation of the Customs Union, the political significance of which, remembers the weekly, one of the proponents of Fishing season jealous of the unification of Germany.

The Economist cites the opinion Andrei Sannikov about the current Russian-Belarusian pragandystskuyu war: "For the first time in the last 16 years, people in Belarus, Russia look to with hope."

In this battle, there is no point of no return, because both sides are not fighting the noble knights, but cynical traders …

Weekly notes that this hope may be premature. "Mr Lukashenko often managed to outplay his Russian sponsors, who are afraid of losing Belarus in favor of the West. Russian attack may be aimed more at intimidation of Mr Lukashenko, than to overthrow him," — says The Economist.

The Economist also quotes Fyodor Lukyanov, who believes that "this battle is no point of no return, because both sides are not fighting the noble knights, merchants and cynical."

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