Disaster particularly seriously affected the Asian cities

Deadly floods, power outages, endless traffic jams — all a result of rapid economic development, extreme weather conditions and migration of rural residents to cities. Accordingly, the absence of a competent strategic development plan, a minor investment in infrastructure and the lack of political will has meant that large cities are critically vulnerable to climate change.

Disaster particularly seriously affected the Asian cities

Over the last few years in Bangkok and Manila hit by severe floods for decades, while India was the world's largest power outage due to queries raised by the burgeoning industry, a growing number of houses and offices. This is a situation where countries grow rich quickly, but due to an unexpected disaster at any time, millions of people can go back to living conditions of the third world.
Many Asian cities are growing faster than is the development of infrastructure. The main problem is the lack of political and economic development prospects of the regions. Years of intensive use of groundwater in Bangkok required to meet the needs of the growing population, led to serious casualties. However, despite the warnings of the city, built in a swampy area at risk and go under water in 50 years, continue to grow like mushrooms.
The rapid growth of the city, which blocks the natural waterways and drainage systems running are the main causes of fatal flooding in the Philippine capital, Manila. On the outskirts of large areas of forest have been destroyed to clear the area of apartment blocks for the growing middle and upper classes. River flows violated waste discharge.
However, the conditions of life in India is considered the most dangerous and difficult, especially after the two-day power outage, during which more than 600 million people remained without electricity. While only 30% of the 1.2 billion people living in urban areas, 50.6% less than in China, and 70-80% — than in developed countries. According to preliminary estimates the number of urban population in India in 2030 is expected to increase to 60% (from 377 to 606 million).
In addition to the growing use of home appliances, India every year will need about 350-400 kilometers of new subway lines and about 19-25 thousand kilometers of roads. Mumbai with 20-thousand population per square kilometer is one of the most populous cities. Daily trains carry about 7 million people, with an annual 3,000 people are killed on the tracks. And in the rush hour it becomes difficult for people to breathe.
In the circumstances, Asian governments must take drastic solutions to improve living conditions.

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