Writer-mystery

29.09.2004

29.09.2004


—>


Linton Weeks

Paolo Coelho, in harmony with the inexplicable

"I'm very famous all over the world, but is unknown in America," — says Paolo Coelho.

And it is true. He is one of the most successful writers of the planet, virtually unknown in the United States. According to the magazine Publishing Trends, Coelho's latest novel, "Eleven Minutes" last year led the bestseller lists around the world for longer than any other romay, including the Harry Potter books and the "King of Crime" by John Grisham.

With America's different. "Eleven Minutes", released in the spring of publisher HarperCollins, did not hit the best-seller lists Washington Post and New York Times.

Mysterious. But Coelho — a man living in harmony with the inexplicable. "No one can explain the success — he says mysteriously. — Can be explained only by the defeat."

He said: "We are dealing with a lot of things that we can not understand."

The sky darkens, he puts his elbows on the table. During the day he comes to Le Petit Jardin, a small cafe in the historic center of Montpellier, in the south-west of France, relax and think. Going to rain, but Coelho is not in a hurry. He says measured by absorbing the shrimp paste and that washes down the red house wine.

This is a heavily-built man, with close-cropped blond hair, a graying goatee, tanned, in a black T-shirt. For the blue-rimmed glasses — dark eyes.

On his left forearm he has a tattoo. "This is a butterfly — he says — a symbol of alchemy and transformation." He utters cosmic things.

For example: "As human beings, we restate our values."

The fact that in other mouth would sound pretentious, I Coelho looks natural. He says just about the complex. "Emotions are much more efficient," — he says, when we want to communicate with each other.

It is not surprising popularity of the books devoted to the problems of the spirit, such as "The Fifth Mountain" and "The Book of the warrior of light." "We appeal to spirituality more openly," — he said.

"Why are we here? Sometimes we forget about it. Such stories as" The Book Crusader ", rediscovering our horizon."

"We must recognize the female form of God," — he said.

He pauses, choosing his words. "God — is the mother."

Nearby church bells ringing. Coelho raises his head and smiles, as if the sound is contained in a kind of divine confirmation. "It's a sign," — he said. And shrugs.

"Eleven Minutes" have been published in 39 languages in nearly 50 countries. "The Alchemist" translated into 56 languages in 150 countries, and with the appearance of this book in 1988 around the world sold over 27 million copies.

Julie Serebrinski, American editor Coelho, has a theory about his phenomenal success.

"He writes about the major turning points in our lives," — she said. So his novels attract people whose countries are experiencing a deep, dramatic changes.

"In his work there is something — continues Serebrinski — making you find harmony in life."

She tells another story about the attractiveness of the author.

Serebrinski born in Moscow. Her family immigrated to the United States 25 years ago. Her parents each summer travel to Russia. A couple of years ago Serebrinski phoned her mother, who had just returned from there. "You should read this writer — his mother said. — Because it all go crazy. His name is Paolo something there." It was about Coelho.

"My mother — said Serebrinski — I told you a hundred times that I publish Paulo Coelho"

As Coelho says, he is a famous writer, is not well known in America.

But not quite. In Coelho has fans in our country, and "The Alchemist", the parable of the Spanish shepherd, gave chase a dream, became a bestseller New York Times. About 15 of his books, including a novel about sexual experiences, "Eleven Minutes," sold well, but did not become hits.

Harold Petersen, an economics professor at Boston College, has included "The Alchemist" in an interdisciplinary course for undergraduates. At the seminars, he encourages students to "think about where they've been and where we wanted to go," says Petersen.

"The Alchemist" — he says — perfectly conveys the concept of life as a journey. "His students like this book.

"Almost all the people I'm talking about" The Alchemist "love it" — says Peterson.

There are readers who parable Coelho seems simplistic, but, according to Petersen, "they simply do not understand."

Always provocative, books Coelho originate in his unusual career. He was born in Rio de Janeiro in 1947, the son of an engineer and a homemaker. He attended primary school and the Jesuits won the poetry contest. As stated on its website www.paulocoelho.com, his sister Sonia, too, received a literary prize for the contest by submitting an essay of one of his brother, which he threw in the trash.

From an early age Coelho knew he wanted to be a writer. But parents tried to steer him in a more practical way to engineers.

He rebelled. "I fought with my father and mother, — he said. — I was not submissive."

Tensions continued unabated, and the parents Coelho, since his son was 17 years old, and then placed him in a psychiatric hospital. Over the years he made several attempts to treat with electric shocks.

In the end, the relatives gave up and admitted that Coelho is endowed with creative spirit.

He went to the theater in Rio, grow long hair, dabbled in drugs, tried to publish a magazine that did not last long. In 1972, he met musician Raul Seixas, and together they began to write songs in the style of rock 'n' roll. Their second album, "Gita" has become a big hit in Brazil, has sold over half a million copies. As stated on the website Coelho, Seixas they take anti-capitalist "alternative society". They indulged in black magic.

From 1972 to 1982, Coelho wrote dozens of tunes with Seixas and other Brazilian singers, and made a lot of money.

Coelho and Seixas published a number of comic book anti-government, for which they were imprisoned. Coelho was there for a few weeks. Eventually they were released, but Coelho says he was kidnapped and put on a military brig, where he was tortured. According to him, he was saved from death, telling his tormentors that not once been in a mental hospital, and his illness is that he likes to torture himself.

Hoping for a normal life, he went to work for a record company Polygram. There he met the woman who became his first wife. In 1977, they moved to London, but Coelho was miserable, he again wanted to write. He returned to Brazil, and they divorced. He married twice more before being stopped by his old friend Christina Oytitsii. "This is my fourth wife — he says — and the last."

In 1982, Coelho and Oytitsiya visited Germany. During a tour of the concentration camp at Dachau Coelho had a vision. He said that he was a man. A few weeks Coelho again faced with the specter, in a cafe in Amsterdam. "You have to complete the circle — the ghost said. — From now on, all you will see the image of God."

Coelho told the ghost to return to the Catholic faith and to make a pilgrimage along the road to Santiago, between France and Spain. Coelho took this trip. In 1987, he wrote his first book, "Pilgrimage." Since then he has written more than a dozen books.

Today, Coelho and Oytitsiya live in the rebuilt mill in the Pyrenees. "We have found their home in a small village — says Coelho, — accident."

In his life, much happened by accident, he says.

When he was home, every morning he gets up early and makes a two-hour walk from Oytitsiey. "Once a week we go up to the mountain," — he said. After a walk spouses engaged in kyudo, meditative archery. Coelho produces 24 arrows from three bows. "The best bows — the Italian," — he said.

They shoot about an hour. Then they have breakfast and drinking coffee with milk.

Coelho afternoon wandering around on the internet and does his business. His Paulo Coelho Institute, which exists on the part of his fees, a charitable foundation for children and parents.

He writes fiction only when there is a story he wants to tell.

It works fast. Writing a novel is just a few weeks. Then it shows the product to friends and processes with regard to their comments. He has a book out every two years, so the market is not saturated. His novel "The Zahir," about the author of best-sellers, going on the road to Santiago, who has everything, including a mill in the Pyrenees, but whose wife left, will be released in Brazil in the spring.

Coelho believes that the basis of all four stories is the story: the love of two people, three people love, power struggles and travel. "In essence," The Alchemist "is a retelling of" 1001 Nights ", — he said.

As if on cue, a woman from the table at the opposite end of the patio approaches and asks if it was true that he Paolo Kael. She asked for autographs and repeatedly photographed with the patient writer. He, in turn, shoots a cigarette from her son.

He returns to the conversation. "If you are not translated into English, you're nothing," — he said.

Coelho surprised her success. He constantly hears about the pirated editions of his books.

It sells well in such distinct countries like Iran and Israel. He can not explain this fact. And do not try. He takes the joke of fate.

"I always dreamed that I would have enough money to travel — he says, and cigarette smoke rising above his head like a genie. Now that I'm rich as Croesus, he says," I invited everywhere for free. "

And he drives.

When he leaves, another woman, who had learned that Coelho has lunch at this cafe brings several books and asking them to sign. One of them — a pirate edition. Coelho gladly signs it. He shakes hands with a few of his fans.

On the street he continues to talk about things that can not be explained. He utters one maxim. Then another. With a shrug, he turned and ambled toward his car parked nearby.

It seems that everywhere the signs. Church bell rings again. In the black clouds of thunder. After a few minutes, of course, it starts to rain.

No pages
Paolo Coelho, in harmony with the inexplicable
"I'm very famous all over the world, but is unknown in America," — says Paolo Coelho.

And it is true. He is one of the most successful writers of the planet, virtually unknown in the United States. According to the magazine Publishing Trends, Coelho's latest novel, "Eleven Minutes" last year led the bestseller lists around the world for longer than any other romay, including the Harry Potter books and the "King of Crime" by John Grisham.

With America's different. "Eleven Minutes", released in the spring of publisher HarperCollins, did not hit the best-seller lists Washington Post and New York Times.

Mysterious. But Coelho — a man living in harmony with the inexplicable. "No one can explain the success — he says mysteriously. — Can be explained only by the defeat."

He said: "We are dealing with a lot of things that we can not understand."

The sky darkens, he puts his elbows on the table. During the day he comes to Le Petit Jardin, a small cafe in the historic center of Montpellier, in the south-west of France, relax and think. Going to rain, but Coelho is not in a hurry. He says measured by absorbing the shrimp paste and that washes down the red house wine.

This is a heavily-built man, with close-cropped blond hair, a graying goatee, tanned, in a black T-shirt. For the blue-rimmed glasses — dark eyes.

On his left forearm he has a tattoo. "This is a butterfly — he says — a symbol of alchemy and transformation." He utters cosmic things.

For example: "As human beings, we restate our values."

The fact that in other mouth would sound pretentious, I Coelho looks natural. He says just about the complex. "Emotions are much more efficient," — he says, when we want to communicate with each other.

It is not surprising popularity of the books devoted to the problems of the spirit, such as "The Fifth Mountain" and "The Book of the warrior of light." "We appeal to spirituality more openly," — he said.

"Why are we here? Sometimes we forget about it. Such stories as" The Book Crusader ", rediscovering our horizon."

"We must recognize the female form of God," — he said.

He pauses, choosing his words. "God — is the mother."

Nearby church bells ringing. Coelho raises his head and smiles, as if the sound is contained in a kind of divine confirmation. "It's a sign," — he said. And shrugs.

"Eleven Minutes" have been published in 39 languages in nearly 50 countries. "The Alchemist" translated into 56 languages in 150 countries, and with the appearance of this book in 1988 around the world sold over 27 million copies.

Julie Serebrinski, American editor Coelho, has a theory about his phenomenal success.

"He writes about the major turning points in our lives," — she said. So his novels attract people whose countries are experiencing a deep, dramatic changes.

"In his work there is something — continues Serebrinski — making you find harmony in life."

She tells another story about the attractiveness of the author.

Serebrinski born in Moscow. Her family immigrated to the United States 25 years ago. Her parents each summer travel to Russia. A couple of years ago Serebrinski phoned her mother, who had just returned from there. "You should read this writer — his mother said. — Because it all go crazy. His name is Paolo something there." It was about Coelho.

"My mother — said Serebrinski — I told you a hundred times that I publish Paulo Coelho"

As Coelho says, he is a famous writer, is not well known in America.

But not quite. In Coelho has fans in our country, and "The Alchemist", the parable of the Spanish shepherd, gave chase a dream, became a bestseller New York Times. About 15 of his books, including a novel about sexual experiences, "Eleven Minutes," sold well, but did not become hits.

Harold Petersen, an economics professor at Boston College, has included "The Alchemist" in an interdisciplinary course for undergraduates. At the seminars, he encourages students to "think about where they've been and where we wanted to go," says Petersen.

"The Alchemist" — he says — perfectly conveys the concept of life as a journey. "His students like this book.

"Almost all the people I'm talking about" The Alchemist "love it" — says Peterson.

There are readers who parable Coelho seems simplistic, but, according to Petersen, "they simply do not understand."

Always provocative, books Coelho originate in his unusual career. He was born in Rio de Janeiro in 1947, the son of an engineer and a homemaker. He attended primary school and the Jesuits won the poetry contest. As stated on its website www.paulocoelho.com, his sister Sonia, too, received a literary prize for the contest by submitting an essay of one of his brother, which he threw in the trash.

From an early age Coelho knew he wanted to be a writer. But parents tried to steer him in a more practical way to engineers.

He rebelled. "I fought with my father and mother, — he said. — I was not submissive."

Tensions continued unabated, and the parents Coelho, since his son was 17 years old, and then placed him in a psychiatric hospital. Over the years he made several attempts to treat with electric shocks.

In the end, the relatives gave up and admitted that Coelho is endowed with creative spirit.

He went to the theater in Rio, grow long hair, dabbled in drugs, tried to publish a magazine that did not last long. In 1972, he met musician Raul Seixas, and together they began to write songs in the style of rock 'n' roll. Their second album, "Gita" has become a big hit in Brazil, has sold over half a million copies. As stated on the website Coelho, Seixas they take anti-capitalist "alternative society". They indulged in black magic.

From 1972 to 1982, Coelho wrote dozens of tunes with Seixas and other Brazilian singers, and made a lot of money.

Coelho and Seixas published a number of comic book anti-government, for which they were imprisoned. Coelho was there for a few weeks. Eventually they were released, but Coelho says he was kidnapped and put on a military brig, where he was tortured. According to him, he was saved from death, telling his tormentors that not once been in a mental hospital, and his illness is that he likes to torture himself.

Hoping for a normal life, he went to work for a record company Polygram. There he met the woman who became his first wife. In 1977, they moved to London, but Coelho was miserable, he again wanted to write. He returned to Brazil, and they divorced. He married twice more before being stopped by his old friend Christina Oytitsii. "This is my fourth wife — he says — and the last."

In 1982, Coelho and Oytitsiya visited Germany. During a tour of the concentration camp at Dachau Coelho had a vision. He said that he was a man. A few weeks Coelho again faced with the specter, in a cafe in Amsterdam. "You have to complete the circle — the ghost said. — From now on, all you will see the image of God."

Coelho told the ghost to return to the Catholic faith and to make a pilgrimage along the road to Santiago, between France and Spain. Coelho took this trip. In 1987, he wrote his first book, "Pilgrimage." Since then he has written more than a dozen books.

Today, Coelho and Oytitsiya live in the rebuilt mill in the Pyrenees. "We have found their home in a small village — says Coelho, — accident."

In his life, much happened by accident, he says.

When he was home, every morning he gets up early and makes a two-hour walk from Oytitsiey. "Once a week we go up to the mountain," — he said. After a walk spouses engaged in kyudo, meditative archery. Coelho produces 24 arrows from three bows. "The best bows — the Italian," — he said.

They shoot about an hour. Then they have breakfast and drinking coffee with milk.

Coelho afternoon wandering around on the internet and does his business. His Paulo Coelho Institute, which exists on the part of his fees, a charitable foundation for children and parents.

He writes fiction only when there is a story he wants to tell.

It works fast. Writing a novel is just a few weeks. Then it shows the product to friends and processes with regard to their comments. He has a book out every two years, so the market is not saturated. His novel "The Zahir," about the author of best-sellers, going on the road to Santiago, who has everything, including a mill in the Pyrenees, but whose wife left, will be released in Brazil in the spring.

Coelho believes that the basis of all four stories is the story: the love of two people, three people love, power struggles and travel. "In essence," The Alchemist "is a retelling of" 1001 Nights ", — he said.

As if on cue, a woman from the table at the opposite end of the patio approaches and asks if it was true that he Paolo Kael. She asked for autographs and repeatedly photographed with the patient writer. He, in turn, shoots a cigarette from her son.

He returns to the conversation. "If you are not translated into English, you're nothing," — he said.

Coelho surprised her success. He constantly hears about the pirated editions of his books.

It sells well in such distinct countries like Iran and Israel. He can not explain this fact. And do not try. He takes the joke of fate.

"I always dreamed that I would have enough money to travel — he says, and cigarette smoke rising above his head like a genie. Now that I'm rich as Croesus, he says," I invited everywhere for free. "

And he drives.

When he leaves, another woman, who had learned that Coelho has lunch at this cafe brings several books and asking them to sign. One of them — a pirate edition. Coelho gladly signs it. He shakes hands with a few of his fans.

On the street he continues to talk about things that can not be explained. He utters one maxim. Then another. With a shrug, he turned and ambled toward his car parked nearby.

It seems that everywhere the signs. Church bell rings again. In the black clouds of thunder. After a few minutes, of course, it starts to rain.

Paolo Coelho, in harmony with the inexplicable
"I'm very famous all over the world, but is unknown in America," — says Paolo Coelho.

And it is true. He is one of the most successful writers of the planet, virtually unknown in the United States. According to the magazine Publishing Trends, Coelho's latest novel, "Eleven Minutes" last year led the bestseller lists around the world for longer than any other romay, including the Harry Potter books and the "King of Crime" by John Grisham.

With America's different. "Eleven Minutes", released in the spring of publisher HarperCollins, did not hit the best-seller lists Washington Post and New York Times.

Mysterious. But Coelho — a man living in harmony with the inexplicable. "No one can explain the success — he says mysteriously. — Can be explained only by the defeat."

He said: "We are dealing with a lot of things that we can not understand."

The sky darkens, he puts his elbows on the table. During the day he comes to Le Petit Jardin, a small cafe in the historic center of Montpellier, in the south-west of France, relax and think. Going to rain, but Coelho is not in a hurry. He says measured by absorbing the shrimp paste and that washes down the red house wine.

This is a heavily-built man, with close-cropped blond hair, a graying goatee, tanned, in a black T-shirt. For the blue-rimmed glasses — dark eyes.

On his left forearm he has a tattoo. "This is a butterfly — he says — a symbol of alchemy and transformation." He utters cosmic things.

For example: "As human beings, we restate our values."

The fact that in other mouth would sound pretentious, I Coelho looks natural. He says just about the complex. "Emotions are much more efficient," — he says, when we want to communicate with each other.

It is not surprising popularity of the books devoted to the problems of the spirit, such as "The Fifth Mountain" and "The Book of the warrior of light." "We appeal to spirituality more openly," — he said.

"Why are we here? Sometimes we forget about it. Such stories as" The Book Crusader ", rediscovering our horizon."

"We must recognize the female form of God," — he said.

He pauses, choosing his words. "God — is the mother."

Nearby church bells ringing. Coelho raises his head and smiles, as if the sound is contained in a kind of divine confirmation. "It's a sign," — he said. And shrugs.

"Eleven Minutes" have been published in 39 languages in nearly 50 countries. "The Alchemist" translated into 56 languages in 150 countries, and with the appearance of this book in 1988 around the world sold over 27 million copies.

Julie Serebrinski, American editor Coelho, has a theory about his phenomenal success.

"He writes about the major turning points in our lives," — she said. So his novels attract people whose countries are experiencing a deep, dramatic changes.

"In his work there is something — continues Serebrinski — making you find harmony in life."

She tells another story about the attractiveness of the author.

Serebrinski born in Moscow. Her family immigrated to the United States 25 years ago. Her parents each summer travel to Russia. A couple of years ago Serebrinski phoned her mother, who had just returned from there. "You should read this writer — his mother said. — Because it all go crazy. His name is Paolo something there." It was about Coelho.

"My mother — said Serebrinski — I told you a hundred times that I publish Paulo Coelho"

As Coelho says, he is a famous writer, is not well known in America.

But not quite. In Coelho has fans in our country, and "The Alchemist", the parable of the Spanish shepherd, gave chase a dream, became a bestseller New York Times. About 15 of his books, including a novel about sexual experiences, "Eleven Minutes," sold well, but did not become hits.

Harold Petersen, an economics professor at Boston College, has included "The Alchemist" in an interdisciplinary course for undergraduates. At the seminars, he encourages students to "think about where they've been and where we wanted to go," says Petersen.

"The Alchemist" — he says — perfectly conveys the concept of life as a journey. "His students like this book.

"Almost all the people I'm talking about" The Alchemist "love it" — says Peterson.

There are readers who parable Coelho seems simplistic, but, according to Petersen, "they simply do not understand."

Always provocative, books Coelho originate in his unusual career. He was born in Rio de Janeiro in 1947, the son of an engineer and a homemaker. He attended primary school and the Jesuits won the poetry contest. As stated on its website www.paulocoelho.com, his sister Sonia, too, received a literary prize for the contest by submitting an essay of one of his brother, which he threw in the trash.

From an early age Coelho knew he wanted to be a writer. But parents tried to steer him in a more practical way to engineers.

He rebelled. "I fought with my father and mother, — he said. — I was not submissive."

Tensions continued unabated, and the parents Coelho, since his son was 17 years old, and then placed him in a psychiatric hospital. Over the years he made several attempts to treat with electric shocks.

In the end, the relatives gave up and admitted that Coelho is endowed with creative spirit.

He went to the theater in Rio, grow long hair, dabbled in drugs, tried to publish a magazine that did not last long. In 1972, he met musician Raul Seixas, and together they began to write songs in the style of rock 'n' roll. Their second album, "Gita" has become a big hit in Brazil, has sold over half a million copies. As stated on the website Coelho, Seixas they take anti-capitalist "alternative society". They indulged in black magic.

From 1972 to 1982, Coelho wrote dozens of tunes with Seixas and other Brazilian singers, and made a lot of money.

Coelho and Seixas published a number of comic book anti-government, for which they were imprisoned. Coelho was there for a few weeks. Eventually they were released, but Coelho says he was kidnapped and put on a military brig, where he was tortured. According to him, he was saved from death, telling his tormentors that not once been in a mental hospital, and his illness is that he likes to torture himself.

Hoping for a normal life, he went to work for a record company Polygram. There he met the woman who became his first wife. In 1977, they moved to London, but Coelho was miserable, he again wanted to write. He returned to Brazil, and they divorced. He married twice more before being stopped by his old friend Christina Oytitsii. "This is my fourth wife — he says — and the last."

In 1982, Coelho and Oytitsiya visited Germany. During a tour of the concentration camp at Dachau Coelho had a vision. He said that he was a man. A few weeks Coelho again faced with the specter, in a cafe in Amsterdam. "You have to complete the circle — the ghost said. — From now on, all you will see the image of God."

Coelho told the ghost to return to the Catholic faith and to make a pilgrimage along the road to Santiago, between France and Spain. Coelho took this trip. In 1987, he wrote his first book, "Pilgrimage." Since then he has written more than a dozen books.

Today, Coelho and Oytitsiya live in the rebuilt mill in the Pyrenees. "We have found their home in a small village — says Coelho, — accident."

In his life, much happened by accident, he says.

When he was home, every morning he gets up early and makes a two-hour walk from Oytitsiey. "Once a week we go up to the mountain," — he said. After a walk spouses engaged in kyudo, meditative archery. Coelho produces 24 arrows from three bows. "The best bows — the Italian," — he said.

They shoot about an hour. Then they have breakfast and drinking coffee with milk.

Coelho afternoon wandering around on the internet and does his business. His Paulo Coelho Institute, which exists on the part of his fees, a charitable foundation for children and parents.

He writes fiction only when there is a story he wants to tell.

It works fast. Writing a novel is just a few weeks. Then it shows the product to friends and processes with regard to their comments. He has a book out every two years, so the market is not saturated. His novel "The Zahir," about the author of best-sellers, going on the road to Santiago, who has everything, including a mill in the Pyrenees, but whose wife left, will be released in Brazil in the spring.

Coelho believes that the basis of all four stories is the story: the love of two people, three people love, power struggles and travel. "In essence," The Alchemist "is a retelling of" 1001 Nights ", — he said.

As if on cue, a woman from the table at the opposite end of the patio approaches and asks if it was true that he Paolo Kael. She asked for autographs and repeatedly photographed with the patient writer. He, in turn, shoots a cigarette from her son.

He returns to the conversation. "If you are not translated into English, you're nothing," — he said.

Coelho surprised her success. He constantly hears about the pirated editions of his books.

It sells well in such distinct countries like Iran and Israel. He can not explain this fact. And do not try. He takes the joke of fate.

"I always dreamed that I would have enough money to travel — he says, and cigarette smoke rising above his head like a genie. Now that I'm rich as Croesus, he says," I invited everywhere for free. "

And he drives.

When he leaves, another woman, who had learned that Coelho has lunch at this cafe brings several books and asking them to sign. One of them — a pirate edition. Coelho gladly signs it. He shakes hands with a few of his fans.

On the street he continues to talk about things that can not be explained. He utters one maxim. Then another. With a shrug, he turned and ambled toward his car parked nearby.

It seems that everywhere the signs. Church bell rings again. In the black clouds of thunder. After a few minutes, of course, it starts to rain.

Paolo Coelho, in harmony with the inexplicable
"I'm very famous all over the world, but is unknown in America," — says Paolo Coelho.

And it is true. He is one of the most successful writers of the planet, virtually unknown in the United States. According to the magazine Publishing Trends, Coelho's latest novel, "Eleven Minutes" last year led the bestseller lists around the world for longer than any other romay, including the Harry Potter books and the "King of Crime" by John Grisham.

With America's different. "Eleven Minutes", released in the spring of publisher HarperCollins, did not hit the best-seller lists Washington Post and New York Times.

Mysterious. But Coelho — a man living in harmony with the inexplicable. "No one can explain the success — he says mysteriously. — Can be explained only by the defeat."

He said: "We are dealing with a lot of things that we can not understand."

The sky darkens, he puts his elbows on the table. During the day he comes to Le Petit Jardin, a small cafe in the historic center of Montpellier, in the south-west of France, relax and think. Going to rain, but Coelho is not in a hurry. He says measured by absorbing the shrimp paste and that washes down the red house wine.

This is a heavily-built man, with close-cropped blond hair, a graying goatee, tanned, in a black T-shirt. For the blue-rimmed glasses — dark eyes.

On his left forearm he has a tattoo. "This is a butterfly — he says — a symbol of alchemy and transformation." He utters cosmic things.

For example: "As human beings, we restate our values."

The fact that in other mouth would sound pretentious, I Coelho looks natural. He says just about the complex. "Emotions are much more efficient," — he says, when we want to communicate with each other.

It is not surprising popularity of the books devoted to the problems of the spirit, such as "The Fifth Mountain" and "The Book of the warrior of light." "We appeal to spirituality more openly," — he said.

"Why are we here? Sometimes we forget about it. Such stories as" The Book Crusader ", rediscovering our horizon."

"We must recognize the female form of God," — he said.

He pauses, choosing his words. "God — is the mother."

Nearby church bells ringing. Coelho raises his head and smiles, as if the sound is contained in a kind of divine confirmation. "It's a sign," — he said. And shrugs.

"Eleven Minutes" have been published in 39 languages in nearly 50 countries. "The Alchemist" translated into 56 languages in 150 countries, and with the appearance of this book in 1988 around the world sold over 27 million copies.

Julie Serebrinski, American editor Coelho, has a theory about his phenomenal success.

"He writes about the major turning points in our lives," — she said. So his novels attract people whose countries are experiencing a deep, dramatic changes.

"In his work there is something — continues Serebrinski — making you find harmony in life."

She tells another story about the attractiveness of the author.

Serebrinski born in Moscow. Her family immigrated to the United States 25 years ago. Her parents each summer travel to Russia. A couple of years ago Serebrinski phoned her mother, who had just returned from there. "You should read this writer — his mother said. — Because it all go crazy. His name is Paolo something there." It was about Coelho.

"My mother — said Serebrinski — I told you a hundred times that I publish Paulo Coelho"

As Coelho says, he is a famous writer, is not well known in America.

But not quite. In Coelho has fans in our country, and "The Alchemist", the parable of the Spanish shepherd, gave chase a dream, became a bestseller New York Times. About 15 of his books, including a novel about sexual experiences, "Eleven Minutes," sold well, but did not become hits.

Harold Petersen, an economics professor at Boston College, has included "The Alchemist" in an interdisciplinary course for undergraduates. At the seminars, he encourages students to "think about where they've been and where we wanted to go," says Petersen.

"The Alchemist" — he says — perfectly conveys the concept of life as a journey. "His students like this book.

"Almost all the people I'm talking about" The Alchemist "love it" — says Peterson.

There are readers who parable Coelho seems simplistic, but, according to Petersen, "they simply do not understand."

Always provocative, books Coelho originate in his unusual career. He was born in Rio de Janeiro in 1947, the son of an engineer and a homemaker. He attended primary school and the Jesuits won the poetry contest. As stated on its website www.paulocoelho.com, his sister Sonia, too, received a literary prize for the contest by submitting an essay of one of his brother, which he threw in the trash.

From an early age Coelho knew he wanted to be a writer. But parents tried to steer him in a more practical way to engineers.

He rebelled. "I fought with my father and mother, — he said. — I was not submissive."

Tensions continued unabated, and the parents Coelho, since his son was 17 years old, and then placed him in a psychiatric hospital. Over the years he made several attempts to treat with electric shocks.

In the end, the relatives gave up and admitted that Coelho is endowed with creative spirit.

He went to the theater in Rio, grow long hair, dabbled in drugs, tried to publish a magazine that did not last long. In 1972, he met musician Raul Seixas, and together they began to write songs in the style of rock 'n' roll. Their second album, "Gita" has become a big hit in Brazil, has sold over half a million copies. As stated on the website Coelho, Seixas they take anti-capitalist "alternative society". They indulged in black magic.

From 1972 to 1982, Coelho wrote dozens of tunes with Seixas and other Brazilian singers, and made a lot of money.

Coelho and Seixas published a number of comic book anti-government, for which they were imprisoned. Coelho was there for a few weeks. Eventually they were released, but Coelho says he was kidnapped and put on a military brig, where he was tortured. According to him, he was saved from death, telling his tormentors that not once been in a mental hospital, and his illness is that he likes to torture himself.

Hoping for a normal life, he went to work for a record company Polygram. There he met the woman who became his first wife. In 1977, they moved to London, but Coelho was miserable, he again wanted to write. He returned to Brazil, and they divorced. He married twice more before being stopped by his old friend Christina Oytitsii. "This is my fourth wife — he says — and the last."

In 1982, Coelho and Oytitsiya visited Germany. During a tour of the concentration camp at Dachau Coelho had a vision. He said that he was a man. A few weeks Coelho again faced with the specter, in a cafe in Amsterdam. "You have to complete the circle — the ghost said. — From now on, all you will see the image of God."

Coelho told the ghost to return to the Catholic faith and to make a pilgrimage along the road to Santiago, between France and Spain. Coelho took this trip. In 1987, he wrote his first book, "Pilgrimage." Since then he has written more than a dozen books.

Today, Coelho and Oytitsiya live in the rebuilt mill in the Pyrenees. "We have found their home in a small village — says Coelho, — accident."

In his life, much happened by accident, he says.

When he was home, every morning he gets up early and makes a two-hour walk from Oytitsiey. "Once a week we go up to the mountain," — he said. After a walk spouses engaged in kyudo, meditative archery. Coelho produces 24 arrows from three bows. "The best bows — the Italian," — he said.

They shoot about an hour. Then they have breakfast and drinking coffee with milk.

Coelho afternoon wandering around on the internet and does his business. His Paulo Coelho Institute, which exists on the part of his fees, a charitable foundation for children and parents.

He writes fiction only when there is a story he wants to tell.

It works fast. Writing a novel is just a few weeks. Then it shows the product to friends and processes with regard to their comments. He has a book out every two years, so the market is not saturated. His novel "The Zahir," about the author of best-sellers, going on the road to Santiago, who has everything, including a mill in the Pyrenees, but whose wife left, will be released in Brazil in the spring.

Coelho believes that the basis of all four stories is the story: the love of two people, three people love, power struggles and travel. "In essence," The Alchemist "is a retelling of" 1001 Nights ", — he said.

As if on cue, a woman from the table at the opposite end of the patio approaches and asks if it was true that he Paolo Kael. She asked for autographs and repeatedly photographed with the patient writer. He, in turn, shoots a cigarette from her son.

He returns to the conversation. "If you are not translated into English, you're nothing," — he said.

Coelho surprised her success. He constantly hears about the pirated editions of his books.

It sells well in such distinct countries like Iran and Israel. He can not explain this fact. And do not try. He takes the joke of fate.

"I always dreamed that I would have enough money to travel — he says, and cigarette smoke rising above his head like a genie. Now that I'm rich as Croesus, he says," I invited everywhere for free. "

And he drives.

When he leaves, another woman, who had learned that Coelho has lunch at this cafe brings several books and asking them to sign. One of them — a pirate edition. Coelho gladly signs it. He shakes hands with a few of his fans.

On the street he continues to talk about things that can not be explained. He utters one maxim. Then another. With a shrug, he turned and ambled toward his car parked nearby.

It seems that everywhere the signs. Church bell rings again. In the black clouds of thunder. After a few minutes, of course, it starts to rain.

28.09.2004

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