Vagaries of the Tunguska meteorite

31.08.2004

31.08.2004


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Leon Dzharoff

Surprisingly, there are people who still believe that the event in Siberia was the work of space aliens
If there are people more gullible than Americans when it comes to UFOs, it is Russian. And if there is a professional group even more gullible than the Russian, it is journalists. This truism has received further confirmation of this month, when the media all over the world began to appear on the new evidence that the famous Tunguska meteorite was involved UFOs.

What is the Tunguska? It was once a desert region in Siberia, where in 1908 there was a huge explosion that leveled trees and destroyed wildlife over an area of 2000 square kilometers. That night in northern Europe and western Russia heavens shone a mysterious light, and in London, for example, it was light enough that you could read a newspaper on the street.

The only living man, the hunter, who was on the periphery of the explosion, was driven by a blast wave from the door of his hut, but survived. Had such a blast in London, or, say, in New York, the victims would be numbered in the hundreds of thousands.

Most scientists now believe that the Tunguska event was caused by the fall of an asteroid or comet that when entering the atmosphere heated up so much that about 8 km above the surface of the earth explodes with a bursting strength of 10-15 megatons. But it is not the fact of such Russian people as a scientist Yuri Labvin, who heads the public-private fund "Tunguska cosmic phenomenon."

In July Labvin said that he would lead an expedition to Siberia, and said: "We intend to find evidence that collided with the Earth not a meteorite, but an alien spacecraft."

One could see that Labvin was set out to make a remarkable discovery. And this is precisely what happened. The members of a scientific expedition led by Labvin in early August combed the area in the vicinity of the explosion and choked with emotion have announced that they have discovered the remains of an alien space ship in the form of a large metal debris.

Sending a 50-pound piece of metal to the laboratory for examination Labvin prefer not to wait for the results. "I can officially say that we have saved some forces that represent the highest civilization — he proclaimed. — They blew this huge meteorite that was heading towards the Earth at high speed. Now we finally were able to detect traces of the object that caused the explosion of a meteorite."

His statement was met with a loud raspberry from respected scientists. The site Space.com published an interview with a British researcher Benny Peizerat — the moderator of the forum dedicated to asteroids and other potential threats to natural sources of online CCNet. Russian scientist named message investigator "rather stupid hoax." Crucially, he said, and about journalists: "The fact that such blatant nonsense gets press coverage, shows the extremely poor state of current scientific minds of some journalists, demonstrating blatant promiscuity."

But writer James Oberg in this story is not surprised. In 1982, in his book "UFOs and the mysteries of outer space" traced the origin of the Russian obsession with extraterrestrial origin of the Tunguska event to the science fiction writer Kazantsev, who wrote a story in which the accident was due to an atomic explosion at a Martian spaceship.

Russian swallowed the bait. Astronomy teacher Felix Siegel, an enthusiast of the theory of flying saucers, became an ardent supporter of the "alien" version of the Tunguska event, a scientist Aleksey Zolotov started accomplished without evidence, but almost every year to say that he was able to detect radiation at the blast site.

Oberg predicted that the theory of an alien spacecraft in the Tunguska in various forms will arise again, and again the Russian ufologists can fool the most gullible journalists. More than twenty years later, his predictions continue to come true.

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Surprisingly, there are people who still believe that the event in Siberia was the work of space aliens
If there are people more gullible than Americans when it comes to UFOs, it is Russian. And if there is a professional group even more gullible than the Russian, it is journalists. This truism has received further confirmation of this month, when the media all over the world began to appear on the new evidence that the famous Tunguska meteorite was involved UFOs.

What is the Tunguska? It was once a desert region in Siberia, where in 1908 there was a huge explosion that leveled trees and destroyed wildlife over an area of 2000 square kilometers. That night in northern Europe and western Russia heavens shone a mysterious light, and in London, for example, it was light enough that you could read a newspaper on the street.

The only living man, the hunter, who was on the periphery of the explosion, was driven by a blast wave from the door of his hut, but survived. Had such a blast in London, or, say, in New York, the victims would be numbered in the hundreds of thousands.

Most scientists now believe that the Tunguska event was caused by the fall of an asteroid or comet that when entering the atmosphere heated up so much that about 8 km above the surface of the earth explodes with a bursting strength of 10-15 megatons. But it is not the fact of such Russian people as a scientist Yuri Labvin, who heads the public-private fund "Tunguska cosmic phenomenon."

In July Labvin said that he would lead an expedition to Siberia, and said: "We intend to find evidence that collided with the Earth not a meteorite, but an alien spacecraft."

One could see that Labvin was set out to make a remarkable discovery. And this is precisely what happened. The members of a scientific expedition led by Labvin in early August combed the area in the vicinity of the explosion and choked with emotion have announced that they have discovered the remains of an alien space ship in the form of a large metal debris.

Sending a 50-pound piece of metal to the laboratory for examination Labvin prefer not to wait for the results. "I can officially say that we have saved some forces that represent the highest civilization — he proclaimed. — They blew this huge meteorite that was heading towards the Earth at high speed. Now we finally were able to detect traces of the object that caused the explosion of a meteorite."

His statement was met with a loud raspberry from respected scientists. The site Space.com published an interview with a British researcher Benny Peizerat — the moderator of the forum dedicated to asteroids and other potential threats to natural sources of online CCNet. Russian scientist named message investigator "rather stupid hoax." Crucially, he said, and about journalists: "The fact that such blatant nonsense gets press coverage, shows the extremely poor state of current scientific minds of some journalists, demonstrating blatant promiscuity."

But writer James Oberg in this story is not surprised. In 1982, in his book "UFOs and the mysteries of outer space" traced the origin of the Russian obsession with extraterrestrial origin of the Tunguska event to the science fiction writer Kazantsev, who wrote a story in which the accident was due to an atomic explosion at a Martian spaceship.

Russian swallowed the bait. Astronomy teacher Felix Siegel, an enthusiast of the theory of flying saucers, became an ardent supporter of the "alien" version of the Tunguska event, and the scientist Aleksey Zolotov started accomplished without evidence, but almost every year to say that he was able to detect radiation at the blast site.

Oberg predicted that the theory of an alien spacecraft in the Tunguska in various forms will arise again, and again the Russian ufologists can fool the most gullible journalists. More than twenty years later, his predictions continue to come true.

Surprisingly, there are people who still believe that the event in Siberia was the work of space aliens
If there are people more gullible than Americans when it comes to UFOs, it is Russian. And if there is a professional group even more gullible than the Russian, it is journalists. This truism has received further confirmation of this month, when the media all over the world began to appear on the new evidence that the famous Tunguska meteorite was involved UFOs.

What is the Tunguska? It was once a desert region in Siberia, where in 1908 there was a huge explosion that leveled trees and destroyed wildlife over an area of 2000 square kilometers. That night in northern Europe and western Russia heavens shone a mysterious light, and in London, for example, it was light enough that you could read a newspaper on the street.

The only living man, the hunter, who was on the periphery of the explosion, was driven by a blast wave from the door of his hut, but survived. Had such a blast in London, or, say, in New York, the victims would be numbered in the hundreds of thousands.

Most scientists now believe that the Tunguska event was caused by the fall of an asteroid or comet that when entering the atmosphere heated up so much that about 8 km above the surface of the earth explodes with a bursting strength of 10-15 megatons. But it is not the fact of such Russian people as a scientist Yuri Labvin, who heads the public-private fund "Tunguska cosmic phenomenon."

In July Labvin said that he would lead an expedition to Siberia, and said: "We intend to find evidence that collided with the Earth not a meteorite, but an alien spacecraft."

One could see that Labvin was set out to make a remarkable discovery. And this is precisely what happened. The members of a scientific expedition led by Labvin in early August combed the area in the vicinity of the explosion and choked with emotion have announced that they have discovered the remains of an alien space ship in the form of a large metal debris.

Sending a 50-pound piece of metal to the laboratory for examination Labvin prefer not to wait for the results. "I can officially say that we have saved some forces that represent the highest civilization — he proclaimed. — They blew this huge meteorite that was heading towards the Earth at high speed. Now we finally were able to detect traces of the object that caused the explosion of a meteorite."

His statement was met with a loud raspberry from respected scientists. The site Space.com published an interview with a British researcher Benny Peizerat — the moderator of the forum dedicated to asteroids and other potential threats to natural sources of online CCNet. Russian scientist named message investigator "rather stupid hoax." Crucially, he said, and about journalists: "The fact that such blatant nonsense gets press coverage, shows the extremely poor state of current scientific minds of some journalists, demonstrating blatant promiscuity."

But writer James Oberg in this story is not surprised. In 1982, in his book "UFOs and the mysteries of outer space" traced the origin of the Russian obsession with extraterrestrial origin of the Tunguska event to the science fiction writer Kazantsev, who wrote a story in which the accident was due to an atomic explosion at a Martian spaceship.

Russian swallowed the bait. Astronomy teacher Felix Siegel, an enthusiast of the theory of flying saucers, became an ardent supporter of the "alien" version of the Tunguska event, a scientist Aleksey Zolotov started accomplished without evidence, but almost every year to say that he was able to detect radiation at the blast site.

Oberg predicted that the theory of an alien spacecraft in the Tunguska in various forms will arise again, and again the Russian ufologists can fool the most gullible journalists. More than twenty years later, his predictions continue to come true.

Surprisingly, there are people who still believe that the event in Siberia was the work of space aliens
If there are people more gullible than Americans when it comes to UFOs, it is Russian. And if there is a professional group even more gullible than the Russian, it is journalists. This truism has received further confirmation of this month, when the media all over the world began to appear on the new evidence that the famous Tunguska meteorite was involved UFOs.

What is the Tunguska? It was once a desert region in Siberia, where in 1908 there was a huge explosion that leveled trees and destroyed wildlife over an area of 2000 square kilometers. That night in northern Europe and western Russia heavens shone a mysterious light, and in London, for example, it was light enough that you could read a newspaper on the street.

The only living man, the hunter, who was on the periphery of the explosion, was driven by a blast wave from the door of his hut, but survived. Had such a blast in London, or, say, in New York, the victims would be numbered in the hundreds of thousands.

Most scientists now believe that the Tunguska event was caused by the fall of an asteroid or comet that when entering the atmosphere heated up so much that about 8 km above the surface of the earth explodes with a bursting strength of 10-15 megatons. But it is not the fact of such Russian people as a scientist Yuri Labvin, who heads the public-private fund "Tunguska cosmic phenomenon."

In July Labvin said that he would lead an expedition to Siberia, and said: "We intend to find evidence that collided with the Earth not a meteorite, but an alien spacecraft."

One could see that Labvin was set out to make a remarkable discovery. And this is precisely what happened. The members of a scientific expedition led by Labvin in early August combed the area in the vicinity of the explosion and choked with emotion have announced that they have discovered the remains of an alien space ship in the form of a large metal debris.

Sending a 50-pound piece of metal to the laboratory for examination Labvin prefer not to wait for the results. "I can officially say that we have saved some forces that represent the highest civilization — he proclaimed. — They blew this huge meteorite that was heading towards the Earth at high speed. Now we finally were able to detect traces of the object that caused the explosion of a meteorite."

His statement was met with a loud raspberry from respected scientists. The site Space.com published an interview with a British researcher Benny Peizerat — the moderator of the forum dedicated to asteroids and other potential threats to natural sources of online CCNet. Russian scientist named message investigator "rather stupid hoax." Crucially, he said, and about journalists: "The fact that such blatant nonsense gets press coverage, shows the extremely poor state of current scientific minds of some journalists, demonstrating blatant promiscuity."

But writer James Oberg in this story is not surprised. In 1982, in his book "UFOs and the mysteries of outer space" traced the origin of the Russian obsession with extraterrestrial origin of the Tunguska event to the science fiction writer Kazantsev, who wrote a story in which the accident was due to an atomic explosion at a Martian spaceship.

Russian swallowed the bait. Astronomy teacher Felix Siegel, an enthusiast of the theory of flying saucers, became an ardent supporter of the "alien" version of the Tunguska event, a scientist Aleksey Zolotov started accomplished without evidence, but almost every year to say that he was able to detect radiation at the blast site.

Oberg predicted that the theory of an alien spacecraft in the Tunguska in various forms will arise again, and again the Russian ufologists can fool the most gullible journalists. More than twenty years later, his predictions continue to come true.

Surprisingly, there are people who still believe that the event in Siberia was the work of space aliens
If there are people more gullible than Americans when it comes to UFOs, it is Russian. And if there is a professional group even more gullible than the Russian, it is journalists. This truism has received further confirmation of this month, when the media all over the world began to appear on the new evidence that the famous Tunguska meteorite was involved UFOs.

What is the Tunguska? It was once a desert region in Siberia, where in 1908 there was a huge explosion that leveled trees and destroyed wildlife over an area of 2000 square kilometers. That night in northern Europe and western Russia heavens shone a mysterious light, and in London, for example, it was light enough that you could read a newspaper on the street.

The only living man, the hunter, who was on the periphery of the explosion, was driven by a blast wave from the door of his hut, but survived. Had such a blast in London, or, say, in New York, the victims would be numbered in the hundreds of thousands.

Most scientists now believe that the Tunguska event was caused by the fall of an asteroid or comet that when entering the atmosphere heated up so much that about 8 km above the surface of the earth explodes with a bursting strength of 10-15 megatons. But it is not the fact of such Russian people as a scientist Yuri Labvin, who heads the public-private fund "Tunguska cosmic phenomenon."

In July Labvin said that he would lead an expedition to Siberia, and said: "We intend to find evidence that collided with the Earth not a meteorite, but an alien spacecraft."

One could see that Labvin was set out to make a remarkable discovery. And this is precisely what happened. The members of a scientific expedition led by Labvin in early August combed the area in the vicinity of the explosion and choked with emotion have announced that they have discovered the remains of an alien space ship in the form of a large metal debris.

Sending a 50-pound piece of metal to the laboratory for examination Labvin prefer not to wait for the results. "I can officially say that we have saved some forces that represent the highest civilization — he proclaimed. — They blew this huge meteorite that was heading towards the Earth at high speed. Now we finally were able to detect traces of the object that caused the explosion of a meteorite."

His statement was met with a loud raspberry from respected scientists. The site Space.com published an interview with a British researcher Benny Peizerat — the moderator of the forum dedicated to asteroids and other potential threats to natural sources of online CCNet. Russian scientist named message investigator "rather stupid hoax." Crucially, he said, and about journalists: "The fact that such blatant nonsense gets press coverage, shows the extremely poor state of current scientific minds of some journalists, demonstrating blatant promiscuity."

But writer James Oberg in this story is not surprised. In 1982, in his book "UFOs and the mysteries of outer space" traced the origin of the Russian obsession with extraterrestrial origin of the Tunguska event to the science fiction writer Kazantsev, who wrote a story in which the accident was due to an atomic explosion at a Martian spaceship.

Russian swallowed the bait. Astronomy teacher Felix Siegel, an enthusiast of the theory of flying saucers, became an ardent supporter of the "alien" version of the Tunguska event, a scientist Aleksey Zolotov started accomplished without evidence, but almost every year to say that he was able to detect radiation at the blast site.

Oberg predicted that the theory of an alien spacecraft in the Tunguska in various forms will arise again, and again the Russian ufologists can fool the most gullible journalists. More than twenty years later, his predictions continue to come true.

Surprisingly, there are people who still believe that the event in Siberia was the work of space aliens
If there are people more gullible than Americans when it comes to UFOs, it is Russian. And if there is a professional group even more gullible than the Russian, it is journalists. This truism has received further confirmation of this month, when the media all over the world began to appear on the new evidence that the famous Tunguska meteorite was involved UFOs.

What is the Tunguska? It was once a desert region in Siberia, where in 1908 there was a huge explosion that leveled trees and destroyed wildlife over an area of 2000 square kilometers. That night in northern Europe and western Russia heavens shone a mysterious light, and in London, for example, it was light enough that you could read a newspaper on the street.

The only living man, the hunter, who was on the periphery of the explosion, was driven by a blast wave from the door of his hut, but survived. Had such a blast in London, or, say, in New York, the victims would be numbered in the hundreds of thousands.

Most scientists now believe that the Tunguska event was caused by the fall of an asteroid or comet that when entering the atmosphere heated up so much that about 8 km above the surface of the earth explodes with a bursting strength of 10-15 megatons. But it is not the fact of such Russian people as a scientist Yuri Labvin, who heads the public-private fund "Tunguska cosmic phenomenon."

In July Labvin said that he would lead an expedition to Siberia, and said: "We intend to find evidence that collided with the Earth not a meteorite, but an alien spacecraft."

One could see that Labvin was set out to make a remarkable discovery. And this is precisely what happened. The members of a scientific expedition led by Labvin in early August combed the area in the vicinity of the explosion and choked with emotion have announced that they have discovered the remains of an alien space ship in the form of a large metal debris.

Sending a 50-pound piece of metal to the laboratory for examination Labvin prefer not to wait for the results. "I can officially say that we have saved some forces that represent the highest civilization — he proclaimed. — They blew this huge meteorite that was heading towards the Earth at high speed. Now we finally were able to detect traces of the object that caused the explosion of a meteorite."

His statement was met with a loud raspberry from respected scientists. The site Space.com published an interview with a British researcher Benny Peizerat — the moderator of the forum dedicated to asteroids and other potential threats to natural sources of online CCNet. Russian scientist named message investigator "rather stupid hoax." Crucially, he said, and about journalists: "The fact that such blatant nonsense gets press coverage, shows the extremely poor state of current scientific minds of some journalists, demonstrating blatant promiscuity."

But writer James Oberg in this story is not surprised. In 1982, in his book "UFOs and the mysteries of outer space" traced the origin of the Russian obsession with extraterrestrial origin of the Tunguska event to the science fiction writer Kazantsev, who wrote a story in which the accident was due to an atomic explosion at a Martian spaceship.

Russian swallowed the bait. Astronomy teacher Felix Siegel, an enthusiast of the theory of flying saucers, became an ardent supporter of the "alien" version of the Tunguska event, a scientist Aleksey Zolotov started accomplished without evidence, but almost every year to say that he was able to detect radiation at the blast site.

Oberg predicted that the theory of an alien spacecraft in the Tunguska in various forms will arise again, and again the Russian ufologists can fool the most gullible journalists. More than twenty years later, his predictions continue to come true.

Surprisingly, there are people who still believe that the event in Siberia was the work of space aliens
If there are people more gullible than Americans when it comes to UFOs, it is Russian. And if there is a professional group even more gullible than the Russian, it is journalists. This truism has received further confirmation of this month, when the media all over the world began to appear on the new evidence that the famous Tunguska meteorite was involved UFOs.

What is the Tunguska? It was once a desert region in Siberia, where in 1908 there was a huge explosion that leveled trees and destroyed wildlife over an area of 2000 square kilometers. That night in northern Europe and western Russia heavens shone a mysterious light, and in London, for example, it was light enough that you could read a newspaper on the street.

The only living man, the hunter, who was on the periphery of the explosion, was driven by a blast wave from the door of his hut, but survived. Had such a blast in London, or, say, in New York, the victims would be numbered in the hundreds of thousands.

Most scientists now believe that the Tunguska event was caused by the fall of an asteroid or comet that when entering the atmosphere heated up so much that about 8 km above the surface of the earth explodes with a bursting strength of 10-15 megatons. But it is not the fact of such Russian people as a scientist Yuri Labvin, who heads the public-private fund "Tunguska cosmic phenomenon."

In July Labvin said that he would lead an expedition to Siberia, and said: "We intend to find evidence that collided with the Earth not a meteorite, but an alien spacecraft."

One could see that Labvin was set out to make a remarkable discovery. And this is precisely what happened. The members of a scientific expedition led by Labvin in early August combed the area in the vicinity of the explosion and choked with emotion have announced that they have discovered the remains of an alien space ship in the form of a large metal debris.

Sending a 50-pound piece of metal to the laboratory for examination Labvin prefer not to wait for the results. "I can officially say that we have saved some forces that represent the highest civilization — he proclaimed. — They blew this huge meteorite that was heading towards the Earth at high speed. Now we finally were able to detect traces of the object that caused the explosion of a meteorite."

His statement was met with a loud raspberry from respected scientists. The site Space.com published an interview with a British researcher Benny Peizerat — the moderator of the forum dedicated to asteroids and other potential threats to natural sources of online CCNet. Russian scientist named message investigator "rather stupid hoax." Crucially, he said, and about journalists: "The fact that such blatant nonsense gets press coverage, shows the extremely poor state of current scientific minds of some journalists, demonstrating blatant promiscuity."

But writer James Oberg in this story is not surprised. In 1982, in his book "UFOs and the mysteries of outer space" traced the origin of the Russian obsession with extraterrestrial origin of the Tunguska event to the science fiction writer Kazantsev, who wrote a story in which the accident was due to an atomic explosion at a Martian spaceship.

Russian swallowed the bait. Astronomy teacher Felix Siegel, an enthusiast of the theory of flying saucers, became an ardent supporter of the "alien" version of the Tunguska event, a scientist Aleksey Zolotov started accomplished without evidence, but almost every year to say that he was able to detect radiation at the blast site.

Oberg predicted that the theory of an alien spacecraft in the Tunguska in various forms will arise again, and again the Russian ufologists can fool the most gullible journalists. More than twenty years later, his predictions continue to come true.

Surprisingly, there are people who still believe that the event in Siberia was the work of space aliens
If there are people more gullible than Americans when it comes to UFOs, it is Russian. And if there is a professional group even more gullible than the Russian, it is journalists. This truism has received further confirmation of this month, when the media all over the world began to appear on the new evidence that the famous Tunguska meteorite was involved UFOs.

What is the Tunguska? It was once a desert region in Siberia, where in 1908 there was a huge explosion that leveled trees and destroyed wildlife over an area of 2000 square kilometers. That night in northern Europe and western Russia heavens shone a mysterious light, and in London, for example, it was light enough that you could read a newspaper on the street.

The only living man, the hunter, who was on the periphery of the explosion, was driven by a blast wave from the door of his hut, but survived. Had such a blast in London, or, say, in New York, the victims would be numbered in the hundreds of thousands.

Most scientists now believe that the Tunguska event was caused by the fall of an asteroid or comet that when entering the atmosphere heated up so much that about 8 km above the surface of the earth explodes with a bursting strength of 10-15 megatons. But it is not the fact of such Russian people as a scientist Yuri Labvin, who heads the public-private fund "Tunguska cosmic phenomenon."

In July Labvin said that he would lead an expedition to Siberia, and said: "We intend to find evidence that collided with the Earth not a meteorite, but an alien spacecraft."

One could see that Labvin was set out to make a remarkable discovery. And this is precisely what happened. The members of a scientific expedition led by Labvin in early August combed the area in the vicinity of the explosion and choked with emotion have announced that they have discovered the remains of an alien space ship in the form of a large metal debris.

Sending a 50-pound piece of metal to the laboratory for examination Labvin prefer not to wait for the results. "I can officially say that we have saved some forces that represent the highest civilization — he proclaimed. — They blew this huge meteorite that was heading towards the Earth at high speed. Now we finally were able to detect traces of the object that caused the explosion of a meteorite."

His statement was met with a loud raspberry from respected scientists. The site Space.com published an interview with a British researcher Benny Peizerat — the moderator of the forum dedicated to asteroids and other potential threats to natural sources of online CCNet. Russian scientist named message investigator "rather stupid hoax." Crucially, he said, and about journalists: "The fact that such blatant nonsense gets press coverage, shows the extremely poor state of current scientific minds of some journalists, demonstrating blatant promiscuity."

But writer James Oberg in this story is not surprised. In 1982, in his book "UFOs and the mysteries of outer space" traced the origin of the Russian obsession with extraterrestrial origin of the Tunguska event to the science fiction writer Kazantsev, who wrote a story in which the accident was due to an atomic explosion at a Martian spaceship.

Russian swallowed the bait. Astronomy teacher Felix Siegel, an enthusiast of the theory of flying saucers, became an ardent supporter of the "alien" version of the Tunguska event, a scientist Aleksey Zolotov started accomplished without evidence, but almost every year to say that he was able to detect radiation at the blast site.

Oberg predicted that the theory of an alien spacecraft in the Tunguska in various forms will arise again, and again the Russian ufologists can fool the most gullible journalists. More than twenty years later, his predictions continue to come true.

Surprisingly, there are people who still believe that the event in Siberia was the work of space aliens
If there are people more gullible than Americans when it comes to UFOs, it is Russian. And if there is a professional group even more gullible than the Russian, it is journalists. This truism has received further confirmation of this month, when the media all over the world began to appear on the new evidence that the famous Tunguska meteorite was involved UFOs.

What is the Tunguska? It was once a desert region in Siberia, where in 1908 there was a huge explosion that leveled trees and destroyed wildlife over an area of 2000 square kilometers. That night in northern Europe and western Russia heavens shone a mysterious light, and in London, for example, it was light enough that you could read a newspaper on the street.

The only living man, the hunter, who was on the periphery of the explosion, was driven by a blast wave from the door of his hut, but survived. Had such a blast in London, or, say, in New York, the victims would be numbered in the hundreds of thousands.

Most scientists now believe that the Tunguska event was caused by the fall of an asteroid or comet that when entering the atmosphere heated up so much that about 8 km above the surface of the earth explodes with a bursting strength of 10-15 megatons. But it is not the fact of such Russian people as a scientist Yuri Labvin, who heads the public-private fund "Tunguska cosmic phenomenon."

In July Labvin said that he would lead an expedition to Siberia, and said: "We intend to find evidence that collided with the Earth not a meteorite, but an alien spacecraft."

One could see that Labvin was set out to make a remarkable discovery. And this is precisely what happened. The members of a scientific expedition led by Labvin in early August combed the area in the vicinity of the explosion and choked with emotion have announced that they have discovered the remains of an alien space ship in the form of a large metal debris.

Sending a 50-pound piece of metal to the laboratory for examination Labvin prefer not to wait for the results. "I can officially say that we have saved some forces that represent the highest civilization — he proclaimed. — They blew this huge meteorite that was heading towards the Earth at high speed. Now we finally were able to detect traces of the object that caused the explosion of a meteorite."

His statement was met with a loud raspberry from respected scientists. The site Space.com published an interview with a British researcher Benny Peizerat — the moderator of the forum dedicated to asteroids and other potential threats to natural sources of online CCNet. Russian scientist named message investigator "rather stupid hoax." Crucially, he said, and about journalists: "The fact that such blatant nonsense gets press coverage, shows the extremely poor state of current scientific minds of some journalists, demonstrating blatant promiscuity."

But writer James Oberg in this story is not surprised. In 1982, in his book "UFOs and the mysteries of outer space" traced the origin of the Russian obsession with extraterrestrial origin of the Tunguska event to the science fiction writer Kazantsev, who wrote a story in which the accident was due to an atomic explosion at a Martian spaceship.

Russian swallowed the bait. Astronomy teacher Felix Siegel, an enthusiast of the theory of flying saucers, became an ardent supporter of the "alien" version of the Tunguska event, a scientist Aleksey Zolotov started accomplished without evidence, but almost every year to say that he was able to detect radiation at the blast site.

Oberg predicted that the theory of an alien spacecraft in the Tunguska in various forms will arise again, and again the Russian ufologists can fool the most gullible journalists. More than twenty years later, his predictions continue to come true.

Surprisingly, there are people who still believe that the event in Siberia was the work of space aliens
If there are people more gullible than Americans when it comes to UFOs, it is Russian. And if there is a professional group even more gullible than the Russian, it is journalists. This truism has received further confirmation of this month, when the media all over the world began to appear on the new evidence that the famous Tunguska meteorite was involved UFOs.

What is the Tunguska? It was once a desert region in Siberia, where in 1908 there was a huge explosion that leveled trees and destroyed wildlife over an area of 2000 square kilometers. That night in northern Europe and western Russia heavens shone a mysterious light, and in London, for example, it was light enough that you could read a newspaper on the street.

The only living man, the hunter, who was on the periphery of the explosion, was driven by a blast wave from the door of his hut, but survived. Had such a blast in London, or, say, in New York, the victims would be numbered in the hundreds of thousands.

Most scientists now believe that the Tunguska event was caused by the fall of an asteroid or comet that when entering the atmosphere heated up so much that about 8 km above the surface of the earth explodes with a bursting strength of 10-15 megatons. But it is not the fact of such Russian people as a scientist Yuri Labvin, who heads the public-private fund "Tunguska cosmic phenomenon."

In July Labvin said that he would lead an expedition to Siberia, and said: "We intend to find evidence that collided with the Earth not a meteorite, but an alien spacecraft."

One could see that Labvin was set out to make a remarkable discovery. And this is precisely what happened. The members of a scientific expedition led by Labvin in early August combed the area in the vicinity of the explosion and choked with emotion have announced that they have discovered the remains of an alien space ship in the form of a large metal debris.

Sending a 50-pound piece of metal to the laboratory for examination Labvin prefer not to wait for the results. "I can officially say that we have saved some forces that represent the highest civilization — he proclaimed. — They blew this huge meteorite that was heading towards the Earth at high speed. Now we finally were able to detect traces of the object that caused the explosion of a meteorite."

His statement was met with a loud raspberry from respected scientists. The site Space.com published an interview with a British researcher Benny Peizerat — the moderator of the forum dedicated to asteroids and other potential threats to natural sources of online CCNet. Russian scientist named message investigator "rather stupid hoax." Crucially, he said, and about journalists: "The fact that such blatant nonsense gets press coverage, shows the extremely poor state of current scientific minds of some journalists, demonstrating blatant promiscuity."

But writer James Oberg in this story is not surprised. In 1982, in his book "UFOs and the mysteries of outer space" traced the origin of the Russian obsession with extraterrestrial origin of the Tunguska event to the science fiction writer Kazantsev, who wrote a story in which the accident was due to an atomic explosion at a Martian spaceship.

Russian swallowed the bait. Astronomy teacher Felix Siegel, an enthusiast of the theory of flying saucers, became an ardent supporter of the "alien" version of the Tunguska event, a scientist Aleksey Zolotov started accomplished without evidence, but almost every year to say that he was able to detect radiation at the blast site.

Oberg predicted that the theory of an alien spacecraft in the Tunguska in various forms will arise again, and again the Russian ufologists can fool the most gullible journalists. More than twenty years later, his predictions continue to come true.

Surprisingly, there are people who still believe that the event in Siberia was the work of space aliens
If there are people more gullible than Americans when it comes to UFOs, it is Russian. And if there is a professional group even more gullible than the Russian, it is journalists. This truism has received further confirmation of this month, when the media all over the world began to appear on the new evidence that the famous Tunguska meteorite was involved UFOs.

What is the Tunguska? It was once a desert region in Siberia, where in 1908 there was a huge explosion that leveled trees and destroyed wildlife over an area of 2000 square kilometers. That night in northern Europe and western Russia heavens shone a mysterious light, and in London, for example, it was light enough that you could read a newspaper on the street.

The only living man, the hunter, who was on the periphery of the explosion, was driven by a blast wave from the door of his hut, but survived. Had such a blast in London, or, say, in New York, the victims would be numbered in the hundreds of thousands.

Most scientists now believe that the Tunguska event was caused by the fall of an asteroid or comet that when entering the atmosphere heated up so much that about 8 km above the surface of the earth explodes with a bursting strength of 10-15 megatons. But it is not the fact of such Russian people as a scientist Yuri Labvin, who heads the public-private fund "Tunguska cosmic phenomenon."

In July Labvin said that he would lead an expedition to Siberia, and said: "We intend to find evidence that collided with the Earth not a meteorite, but an alien spacecraft."

One could see that Labvin was set out to make a remarkable discovery. And this is precisely what happened. The members of a scientific expedition led by Labvin in early August combed the area in the vicinity of the explosion and choked with emotion have announced that they have discovered the remains of an alien space ship in the form of a large metal debris.

Sending a 50-pound piece of metal to the laboratory for examination Labvin prefer not to wait for the results. "I can officially say that we have saved some forces that represent the highest civilization — he proclaimed. — They blew this huge meteorite that was heading towards the Earth at high speed. Now we finally were able to detect traces of the object that caused the explosion of a meteorite."

His statement was met with a loud raspberry from respected scientists. The site Space.com published an interview with a British researcher Benny Peizerat — the moderator of the forum dedicated to asteroids and other potential threats to natural sources of online CCNet. Russian scientist named message investigator "rather stupid hoax." Crucially, he said, and about journalists: "The fact that such blatant nonsense gets press coverage, shows the extremely poor state of current scientific minds of some journalists, demonstrating blatant promiscuity."

But writer James Oberg in this story is not surprised. In 1982, in his book "UFOs and the mysteries of outer space" traced the origin of the Russian obsession with extraterrestrial origin of the Tunguska event to the science fiction writer Kazantsev, who wrote a story in which the accident was due to an atomic explosion at a Martian spaceship.

Russian swallowed the bait. Astronomy teacher Felix Siegel, an enthusiast of the theory of flying saucers, became an ardent supporter of the "alien" version of the Tunguska event, a scientist Aleksey Zolotov started accomplished without evidence, but almost every year to say that he was able to detect radiation at the blast site.

Oberg predicted that the theory of an alien spacecraft in the Tunguska in various forms will arise again, and again the Russian ufologists can fool the most gullible journalists. More than twenty years later, his predictions continue to come true.

27.08.2004

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