Dead sperm whale found in the UK

12-meter long sperm whale was dropped dead on the beach in East Anglia, is believed to be due to the large wound in his stomach.

Sand around the tail was not deformed, so it is assumed that the animal was already dead before the tide brought the corpse to the sands at Old Hunstanton, Norfolk.

Numerous onlookers came to see the whale, which was lying near the mark of tide.

The representative of the charity organization DIVING BDMLR (British Divers Marine Life Rescue) said that perhaps it was the same whale that was seen off at the landfill Royal Air Force on the other side of the estuary, in Holbich, a few weeks ago.

Scientists from the company have taken samples Zooological animal to leave in order to be carried away by the tide, for natural decomposition.

Many whales have washed up on the coast of the North Sea last year. Especially they have been distributed around the mouth of the Humber.

Environmentalists believe that the increase in the number of strandings could be explained by changes in ocean currents carrying cold Arctic water flows in the North Sea and with them whales that would not normally pass so close to the coastline of the UK.

So, in late September, 10-meter mammal, it is believed that sei whale was found in the marshes on the north bank of the Humber River near the village of Skeffling.

Earlier in the month, a young fin whale — a relative of the sei whale — stuck on Immingeme, North East Lincolnshire, and then re-washed already dead near Cape Spern.

Yorkshire Branch Wildlife Trust, in general, marked increase in the number of observations of whales in 2011, but no one is sure what could be the reason for the increase of mammals in the North Sea.

During the summer, flocks of up to 10 minke whales are regularly seen off the coast of North Yorkshire, between Whitby and Scarborough. Whale experts admit they do not know why the number of the observations and strandings increased.

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