Area ice surfaces in the Arctic continues to decline, reaching a second minimum

Area ice surfaces in the Arctic continues to decline, reaching a second minimum Scientists prove

The data obtained from NASA satellites and the National Information Center for the snow and ice at the University of Colorado (NSIDC), confirmed that the area of ice in the Arctic has declined over the summer to almost record levels of 2007.

Arctic ice cap increases in winter and decreases in summer, reaching each September lows. However, atmospheric and oceanic conditions are not contributing to the melting of ice on such a scale, in contrast to 2007.

According to the chief scientist Goddard Space Flight Center, Joey Comiso, reduced ice cover fits into the overall picture of the melting of the ice in the last three decades. "The sharp decline in ice surfaces reduces the thick layers of ice, endangering the perennial layers."

On 9 September 2011 the annual minimum sea ice was 4.33 million square kilometers. This is the second lowest level in history after 2007. Average ice area was 2.43 million square feet less than the average for 1979-2000. The ice cover in the Arctic, shrinking in size and density by 12% every 10 years. Scientists attribute this to a general increase in temperature around the world.

Photo: NASA Goddard's Scientific Visualization Studio

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